Triple M corner no.150

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

J. B. Carver was a young Oxford undergraduate who took part in a series of national trials* between 1930 and 1932. His car of choice was a 1930 London registered MG Midget GC 5505. This Bill Brunell photo was taken on 12th December 1931 during the MCC’s London-Gloucester Trial. Despite requiring assistance on this hill(?) Carver gained a Silver Medal.

(*Carver took part in the 1930 & 31 MCC London Gloucester, the 1932 Sunbac ‘Colmore’, and the 1930 & 31 Inter Varsity Trials)

Triple M corner no.149

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

LATplate B8920 was taken at the conclusion of the 1932 RAC Ulster TT at the Ards circuit. Here the Managing Director of the MG Car Company, Mr. Cecil Kimber is seen photographed alongside the MG C Type Midget which was driven by E.R. Hall into third position overall, behind the two Riley Nines of Whitcroft and Eyston. (Photo courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.148

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This shot was taken at the 1932 running of the RAC T.T. on the Ards circuit in Northern Ireland. Here, two MG C Type Midgets, driven by S.A. Crabtree (No.28) and F.S. Barnes (No.29) hurtle across a town square (perhaps Comber?) towards a bank of totally unprotected spectators. The tail of another C type (No.32) driven by Goldie Gardner, can just be seen exiting the square to the right. (LAT collection B8869 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.147

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Captain F.H.B. Samuelson and his wife took part in the 1931 Monte Carlo Rally driving a 1931 season metal paneled MG Midget Sportman’s Coupe (RX 7429), covering just over 1000 miles following departure from the John 0′ Groats rally control point. Upon arrival, they were classified 8th in the under 1100 cc class but picked-up first prize in the under 1100 cc ‘Closed Car’ Comfort Competition. The car is seen here (centre background) in a queue of competition winners awaiting presentation of their awards by the  principalities dignataries. This previously unpublished image is from the LAT collection (Plate B5387) and appears here courtesy of Motorsport Images.

Wolseley Hornet specials no.41

By Triple M corner

While coachbuilders’ A.P. Compton had built Arrow Coupe bodies for the Wolseley Hornet, by the time this car was registered (early 1933) Compton’s original company had been sold. The new concern remained at the old Hanwell tram depot base and continued to body Wolseley Hornets, amomg others. The Hornet Coupe featured here was bodied by Compton’s successors, Arrow Coachworks Ltd and was of a design not seen previously. Unfortunately, there are no profile shots available and their period advertisements don’t illustrate this version. This LAT image B9721 of Hornet AHX 415 was taken during the 1933 RAC ‘Hastings’ Rally and shows entry no. 145, driven by D.W. Thompson negotiating traffic in the town centre of Hastings. (Photo courtesy Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.146

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Two images, both taken at Donington Park prior to the start of a ladies race in 1935 show Doreen Evans in the cockpit of her Q Type MG. (LATfilm Motor L197-18 & L197-20 courtesy Motorsport Images)

Triple M Corner no.145

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This scan from a newly discovered Motor magazine 35 mm negative shows MG Midget EX135 at speed on an autobahn near Dessau, Germany, where in May 1939 the car broke a series of records. Below, can be found the National Archives potted biography of the driver, which tells of an exciting life both in the motoring record breaking realm and also away from it.

Alfred Thomas Goldie Gardner was born on May 31st 1890 in Essex, his mother’s maiden name being Goldie. His early motoring interest lay in motorcycles but the First World War interrupted his ambition to race them, and on the outbreak he joined the army, becoming the youngest Major in the British Forces. In 1917 his reconnaissance plane was brought down by enemy fire and he sustained leg and hip injuries that were to hospitalise him for two years and leave him disabled for the rest of his life. In this condition he began motor racing in 1924 and in 1930 he came to the attention of Cecil Kimber the managing director of M.G. and subsequently raced various of these cars with considerable success. In 1934 he bought a streamlined K3 Magnette and after accompanying Sir Malcolm Campbell to Daytona Beach to set a new Land Speed Record, his appetite was whetted for record-breaking, starting with a class record at Brooklands. In 1937 he went to Dessau in Germany where he created a new Flying Mile Record at 148.5mph.. He went on to set further records at Montlhery in France and returned to Germany later in the year to set new records. He now had in mind achieving 200mph for which purpose George Eyston’s Magic Magnette Ex 135 was acquired and modified to produce 196bhp. In November 1938 he returned to Germany and raised the record to 186mph. With the 200mph target still eluding him, in May 1939 he returned yet again to take the 1100cc record to 203mph, and with the engine rebored overnight he also took three 1500cc Class ‘F’ records. Further attempts at the 750cc records were stymied by the outbreak of war, and he first of all joined with Sir Malcolm Campbell in setting up the Mobile Special Constabulary (The Blue Birds) and then helped reorganise civilian transport in liberated Europe. Once the war had ended new Class ‘H’ (750cc) records were achieved in Italy and at Jabbeke, Belgium and then in 1947 Class ‘I’ (500cc) records were set, and in 1948 a Jaguar 2-litre experimental engine was borrowed to set Class ‘E’ (2000cc) records. This allowed him to claim records in 50% of the World International Classes. Further record-breaking continued at Jabbeke and in the USA through 1950-2 but in 1952 he suffered a cerebral haemorrhage and was forced to retire. He was holder of the OBE and received three BRDG Gold Stars. He died in 1958.

Photo courtesy of Motorsport Images

Triple M corner no.144

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

G.W. Wright took part in the 1932 Monte Carlo Rally in this MG C Type Midget (GP 2913). The photograph was taken in low light somewhere in London prior to car and crew setting off for France where they finished 12th in their class. They fared significantly better in the post rally Mont des Mules hill climb where they topped the listing in the 750 cc class. Just 14 months after this photograph was taken, Wright’s C Type was to dramatically catch fire at Brooklands. (see Triple M corner no.83 in the archive) Photo courtesy of Motorsport Images

Triple M corner no.143

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The 1933 JCC Iternational Trophy Race took place on Saturday 6th May at Brooklands and was held in glorious sunshine in front of a large crowd. The racing did not disappoint with household names such as Malcolm Campbell, Lord Howe and Kaye Don taking part along with G.E.T Eyston who was driving the Magic Midget. Here, The Autocar’s talented artist Gordon Crosby captures the moment Eyston’s Midget looses its rear wheel along the start/finish straight just three laps into the race. (Click on the arrows in the trhc to read Motor Sport’s account of the incident.) (LAT photoscan from Autocar 12th May 1933 – courtesy Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.142

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Donington Park 19th August 1933: Taken at McClean’s, this LAT archive image (C1597) shows a gaggle of MG’s including the dicing J2 Midgets of C.H. Masters (no.3) and J.R. Grice (no.15) as they round the bend. Following a short distance behind is a 1933 McEvoy Minor Special (no.12) being driven by Richard Jenson, the car’s body having been built by the Jenson brothers in Wolverhampton to a Michael McEvoy specification. Jenson finished 5th, in this the opening event of the day. (Ed. This image is something of a discovery in that it’s the first such identifiable image of a McEvoy Minor being driven by either of the Jenson brothers to be found by the author.) Photo courtesy of Motor Sport Images. More about the Jenson Brothers here.