Triple M corner no.172

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

WL 7180 was an early 1929 season MG Midget built in Oxford, prior to the company’s move to Abingdon later that year. It was also something of a celebrity vehicle, appearing on the cover of the Light Car & Cycle Car’s February 21st 1930 edition, while also featuring in a number of other magazine photos and snippets. Throughout 1929 and early 1930, J.V. Hay used it to compete in trials and circuit racing making extensive use of WL 7180’s capabilities. The first of the two photographs to be seen here (LATplate B2257) shows the car taking part in a July 1929 JCC High Speed Trial event at Brooklands, catching an Alvis on a bend of the Mountain Circuit. The second image (LATplate B2981) was taken during the running of the 1929 MCC London-Exeter Trial with WL 7180 climbing ‘Ibberton’ in what look to be dreadful conditions. (Both photos courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.171

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This is a LAT Collection Autocar Photoscan from a May 1936 edition of the magazine, showing 1931 MG C Type (VD 30) taking part in that year’s Abingdon Trial. The car survives and continues to compete in the capable hands of Triple M guru Barry Foster.  (Photo: courtesy Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no. 170

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Only 26 cars entered the 1931 Le Mans 24 hour race and just seven finished. As mentioned in earlier TMCs posts, one of those seven finishers was the MG C type of Sir Francis Samuelson and Freddie Kindell who were left ‘unclassified’ as their final lap took in excess of 30 minutes, contravening a race regulation. The second MG C Type to take part that weekend (Car number 32) was privately entered by the Honourable Mrs Joan Chetwynd who co-drove her car with Henry Stisted. Unfortunately, her Midget was forced to retire on lap 30 with an engine related problem. Neither of the other two cars to be seen in this LAT Collection photo (B6272), BNC no. 27 (Duverne & Girod) or the 4.5 litre Bentley no.7 (Bevan & Couper) made it the finish. (Photo courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.169

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This MG C Type Midget was ‘first-in-class’ and finished 6th overall in the 1933 Le Mans 24 hour race. Here, John Ludovic Ford and Maurice Baumer both of whom shared the driving duties that weekend are feted by the locals, including a gendarme and a race official. (LATplate C869 appears here courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.168

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This well executed action shot of an airborn MG Q Type driven by Tim Davies, appeared on page 524 of the 29th March 1935 edition of The Autocar and was taken at Syston Park during the Inter Varsity Speed Trials. Davies eventually wrested the FTD from K.D. Evans (also Q Type) recording a time of 28.0 seconds over the half mile course. (This LAT photoscan appears here courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.167

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Just two MGs’ were entered for the 1931 Le Mans 24 hour endurance race, car no 31 driven by the Samuelson/Kindell pairing, along with car no. 32 that of the Hon. Mrs Chetwynd and Stisted. Both cars were C Type Midgets. Sadly neither car recorded a ‘finish’, Mrs Chetwynd’s Midget failing on lap 30 with timing gear issues, while the Samuelson/Stisted car completed the race only for the result to be expunged, as the car didn’t complete the last lap in under 30 minutes. Above, Mrs Chetwynd’s C Type is seen passing the 1.5 litre Aston Martin driven by Newsome/Peacock as that car leaves the pits. (LAT Motor Sport film – courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.166

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This photograph was taken at the 1933 running of the Le Mans 24 hour race showing the Hendy-Parker MG J3 leading the Singer Nine of Barnes & Langley somewhere on the Circuit de la Sarthe. Unfortunately, the J3 was among the many DNFs’ that day while just one MG Midget, that of Ford and Baumer took the chequered flag, finishing sixth overall. The Singer however did finish, albeit in thirteenth and last place, covering 1900.9 miles in the process. (LATplate C863 – courtesy of Motorsport Images) 

Wolseley Hornet specials no.48

By Triple M corner

This is an interesting late thirties or early post-war snapshot of a Standard Eight (prepared for re-painting) and what could be a 1930 or 31 Abbey Wolseley Hornet special. The age of the car can be determined by the pre-Magna wheels which were only fitted to 1930 and 31 season models. Why the ‘could be’? This car has a single set of louvres and a cheek-line on its bonnet side, while all other Hornet bonnets of this period had three individual groups of louvres without further decoration. Of course by this time in the car’s life, perhaps eight or nine years after it was built, the original bonnet could have been replaced but there is just a chance that there isn’t a Wolseley badge adorning the radiator on this car.

Triple M corner no.165

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s (Midget, Magna & Magnette) all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The Varsity Speed Trials was an annual event, taking place each spring between teams representing Oxford and Cambridge Universities. In 1930 the event venue was a private estate near Newmarket, Suffolk. Here an unnamed undergraduate heads towards the photographer as he pilots a stripped-down MG Midget, devoid of headlamps, wings, valances and windscreen, yet carrying a passenger? (LATplate B3184 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.47

By Triple M corner

This is another eBay snapshot purchase, although on this occasion in negative form.  The car is a 1932 or 1933 Wolseley Hornet Drophead Coupe Special which was bodied by Eustace Watkins. Unfortunately, the registration number is indistinct (possibly KX – a  Buckinghamshire plate). It’s likely that the photograph was taken toward the latter end of the thirties decade in view of the age of the other vehicles in shot.