Triple M corner no.185

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The September 1934 Shelsley Walsh ‘Autumn Hill Climb’ was a damp affair as this re-touched photo of Samuels’s MG Midget testifies. The roosters of spray and the raised brollies held by many spectators in the large crowd are further confirmation if it were needed. Samuels wasn’t among the awards that day. (LAT photoscan – courtesy of Motorsport Images. Photo published on page 631 of 5th October 1934 edition of The Autocar)

Triple M corner no.184

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

In the years running up to the Second World War, Max Millar was perhaps the best known exponent of the art of the automotive cut-away drawing. Here, he has taken on the task of drawing the MG P Type Midget in four-seat form. (LAT collection photo – courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.183

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

1932 Stiles MG F Type Magna ‘Threesome’ special. Arguably the prettiest of the special bodies to be fitted to any MG chassis during the thirties. It was built by Stiles Ltd. their business address being 3, Baker Street, London W.1  See also TMC no.46 (LATplate E2088 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.182

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

JCC Double-Twelve Race Brookland 8th & 9th May 1931

The 1931 ‘Double-Twelve’ race is famous for its top-five clean sweep by a quintet of 746 cc MG C Type Midgets, with the three C Types competing under the Earl of March’s banner also taking the team prize. The 750 cc class represented almost half of the field of 50 cars that year with 10 Austin Sevens competing alongside the 14 MG Montlhery Midgets. Endurance racing is tough on both man and machine and it’s therefore no surprise to find that just 29 cars were still running at the conclusion of the gruelling 24 hour race. Unfortunately, the photographer who took this shot unluckily managed to select three cars that didn’t make it to the finishing line. Here, E. Martin‘s Riley can be seen passing the very smart supercharged MG C Type of the Honourable Mrs Chetwynd, with A.T.G. Gardiner‘s car (70) bringing up the rear. (LATplate B5901 – courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.181

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Yet another heavily retouched photograph from The Autocar magazine, this one from February 1933. The car seen here is the second prototype MG K3 Magnette (JB 1269) which has been fitted with a revised radiator nascelle, that according to a caption (of this same image) in a post-war publication was an “unsightly addittion”. According to the same source, this car was used as a test vehicle for the 1933 Mille Miglia cars. (Photoscan from the LAT collection – courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.180

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This heavily retouched Autocar photo is of an MG C Type Midget being driven by Mrs T.H. (Bill) Wisdom at the Craigantlet Hill Climb, (near Belfast, Northern Ireland) on 14th August 1932. Mrs Wisdom went on to win class III at the event. The photograph appeared in the 19th August 1932 edition of the magazine. (LAT Archive – Autocar photoscan – Courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.50

By Triple M corner

1931 Swallow Wolseley Hornet special Two-seater (RB 3136) was last taxed in the UK in 2007. These four images are all from a carandclassic car listing dating from the spring of 2012 when the car was advertised for sale by a dealer Italy. It looks very much like the car has remained on the continent. The Swallow company were among the first coachbuilders to body the (then) new Hornet chassis.

Triple M corner no. 179

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Yet another photograph from the 1933 RAC TT held at the Ards circuit in Northern Ireland on 2nd September that year. Here, no.19 E.R. Hall in his MG Magnette is seen dicing with W.R. Baird (Riley) at an unknown point on the 13.6 mile road circuit. Hall went on to finish 4th overall and second in his class (behind eventual winner Tazio Nuvolari ) while Baird finished 6th overall and 3rd in his class. (A Motor plate reference 802-42 from the LAT Collection. Photo courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.178

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

F. Gordon Crosby (The Autocar) and Bryan De Grineau (The Motor) were artistic contributors to their respective motoring magazines from the first decade of the twentieth century through to the latter part of the thirties  (De Grineau) and until the commencement of WWII (Crosby). Their work was invariably produced against tight deadlines as they attempted to capture (primarily) sporting action that the camera had missed. Here, in a rare colour image, Crosby records a moment from the 1933 RAC TT as Nuvolari passes the pits in his K3 MG Magnette on his way to a famous victory. The image is a scan of a colour plate from the book Circuit Dust written bt Barre Lyndon and first published by John Miles in 1934.

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.49

By Triple M corner

This snapshot of HY 9201, a mid-1933 Bristol registered Wolseley Hornet Trinity DHC Special, was purchased recently on eBay. It’s likely that the photograph was taken either later on in the thirties or even post war, if the poor condition of the hood material is an indicator. Meredith Coachcraft of Castle Bromwich built the Trinity models and period images of their cars are difficult to find. However, evidence from more recent photographs indicate that at least two of this particular model survive.