Triple M corner no.33

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Throughout the early thirties Charles Wynn wrote a column for The Autocar entitled Touring Topics. The column was invariably headed up by a photograph, which in many cases had been submitted by a reader, and depicted an interesting touring related scene. The LAT archive contains many original pieces of The Autocar artwork which in the case of Touring Topics consisted of a re-touched photo, graphically overwritten in a studio. This is a scan of one such item showing JJ 673, a late 1932 London registered MG J2 Midget on Exmoor, Devon, the photo first appearing in a September 1933 edition of the magazine. (Image courtesy of LAT Photographic)

Triple M Corner no.32

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The supercharged 750 cc ‘C’ Type Midget was MG’s third successful racing car variant after the 12/12 and Le Mans Midgets of 1930. In 1931 a team of ‘C’ Types swept the board at the last running of the Brooklands Double Twelve event, the winning car being driven by the Earl of March and C.S. Staniland who covered 1575 miles at an average speed of 65.63 mph. The first five places went to ‘C’ Type Midgets while three Austin Sevens filled positions seven to nine. This photo is another from the Motor Sport archive and is taken from a poor celluloid negative which has been subject to enhancement in Photoshop. (Image courtesy of LAT Photographic)

Triple M Corner no.31

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

MG K3 Magnette JB 1046 is featured here for a second time, on this occasion by courtesy of an uncaptioned Motor Sport image. The photo looks to have been taken at a pre-war hill-climb event. If anyone has further information they can add, then please contact info@prewarminor.com (Image courtesy of LAT Photographic)

Triple M Corner no.30

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Jensen Motors of West Bromwich were a highly successful coachbuilder at a time when many similar businesses were going to the wall. Apart from building a significant number of bodies for Michael McEvoy, including the the two Minor models (60 & 70), the concern also bodied the Hornet and as can be seen from this Light Car cutting at least one J2 MG Midget OJ 4491.

Triple M Corner no.29

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

1930 Midget KR 4806

R. Littlewood-Clarke owned this Kent registered Midget and is presumably driving the car when it was photographed here taking part in the 1932 MCC Sporting Trial held on 15th October 1932. The trial was centered around the Derbyshire town of Buxton and comprised five observed sections, three of which were covered twice – one of these being the notorious Litton Slack. Littlewood Clarke was one of 28 drivers to collect a Premier Award that day. The viaduct seen in the background may be the clue to provide the answer as to precisely where this Motor Sport sourced image was taken. (Image courtesy LAT Photo)

Triple M Corner no.28

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Another image from the Motor Sport photographic archive. This one shows C. W. M. Wicket’s 1930 MG Midget passing an Austin Seven Ulster during the course of the 1931 MCC London – Land’s End Trial held over Good Friday and Easter Saturday – 3rd & 4th April. The Midget (CV 2027) was first registered in Cornwall in 1930 and local man Wicket went on to collect a Gold award at this event. (Image courtesy of LAT Photographic)

Triple M Corner no.27

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This 1929 Bedfordshire registered MG Midget (TM 5284) is seen here competing in the (7th) December 1935 running of the MCC London-Gloucester Trial with L. Onslow-Bartlett at the wheel. At some point after June 1932 the car had been fitted with a McEvoy body (source Cowbourne) although this head-on view doesn’t permit many of the differences with the standard example to be seen. What the image does reveal is that the front wings are home-made cycle types while the front dumb-iron valance has been removed and the slatted radiator surround is another non-standard addition. The MCC awarded this  car/driver combination a third class award upon completion of the trial.

This image is located in the Motor Sport archive and is reproduced here courtesy of LAT Photographic.

Triple M Corner no.26

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

13th, 14th May 1932 MCC London – Edinburgh Trial

MG Magna TK 7277 was driven by S.W. Cottee and is seen here climbing Park Rash in the Yorkshire Dales during the course of the 1932 running of the event. Cottee won a Premier Award for his (and the car’s) efforts over the two days.

(This image is held in the Motor Sport image archive and is reproduced here by permission of LAT Photographic)

Triple M Corner no.25

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Launched in July 1934 the MG KN Magnette (pillar-less) Saloon was a six cylinder  fast touring car, just 200 of which were built in its short production life which ended in 1935. (Source: Mike Allison ‘The Magic of the Marque’.) The KN Magnette was built upon the 9′ lwb K chassis and weighed in at just under 16 cwt. (LAT ‘Motor’ Plate 525-8)

Triple M Corner no.24

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

By the start of the 1932 season the original MG Midget was fast approaching the end of its production life. Fabric clad bodies were rapidly disappearing from model ranges, the last Minors  to be thus skinned being the 1931 season Semi-Sports, along with the S.V. and O.H.C. Fabric Saloons and these only sold in very low numbers. The ‘M’ Type Midget was about to give-way to the new J2 model on the Abingdon production lines and just 187 original Midgets were made that season, of which all but 37 were metal paneled cars. A distinguishing feature of these metal clad models was the shorter boot lid made to accommodate the permanently attached hood – note the visible hood rails. (LAT Photo Scan)