Triple M corner no.166

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This photograph was taken at the 1933 running of the Le Mans 24 hour race showing the Hendy-Parker MG J3 leading the Singer Nine of Barnes & Langley somewhere on the Circuit de la Sarthe. Unfortunately, the J3 was among the many DNFs’ that day while just one MG Midget, that of Ford and Baumer took the chequered flag, finishing sixth overall. The Singer however did finish, albeit in thirteenth and last place, covering 1900.9 miles in the process. (LATplate C863 – courtesy of Motorsport Images) 

Wolseley Hornet specials no.48

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This is an interesting late thirties or early post-war snapshot of a Standard Eight (prepared for re-painting) and what could be a 1930 or 31 Abbey Wolseley Hornet special. The age of the car can be determined by the pre-Magna wheels which were only fitted to 1930 and 31 season models. Why the ‘could be’? This car has a single set of louvres and a cheek-line on its bonnet side, while all other Hornet bonnets of this period had three individual groups of louvres without further decoration. Of course by this time in the car’s life, perhaps eight or nine years after it was built, the original bonnet could have been replaced but there is just a chance that there isn’t a Wolseley badge adorning the radiator on this car.

Triple M corner no.165

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The Triple M series of MG’s (Midget, Magna & Magnette) all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The Varsity Speed Trials was an annual event, taking place each spring between teams representing Oxford and Cambridge Universities. In 1930 the event venue was a private estate near Newmarket, Suffolk. Here an unnamed undergraduate heads towards the photographer as he pilots a stripped-down MG Midget, devoid of headlamps, wings, valances and windscreen, yet carrying a passenger? (LATplate B3184 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.47

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This is another eBay snapshot purchase, although on this occasion in negative form.  The car is a 1932 or 1933 Wolseley Hornet Drophead Coupe Special which was bodied by Eustace Watkins. Unfortunately, the registration number is indistinct (possibly KX – a  Buckinghamshire plate). It’s likely that the photograph was taken toward the latter end of the thirties decade in view of the age of the other vehicles in shot.

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.46

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The coachbuilding firm of R.E.A.L. was located in Ealing, London W.5 and in the early to mid-thirties the business designed and constructed some extremeley good looking light car bodies, including this 2+2 fixed-head coupe type (seen above) fitted to a 1932 Wolseley Hornet Special chassis. Motor Sport magazine provided a comprehensive description of the model (known as the ‘Patrician’) in its August 1932 edition (page 474) and the car’s art deco interior styling and opulent finish is very apparent in this publicity photograph.

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.45

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Over the weekend of 14th-18th March 1933 The RAC ‘Hastings’ Rally took place, only the second such running of the event following its inauguration in 1932. In all, 327 cars took part, starting from 9 different venues across the UK, and included among them were 23 Wolseley Hornets. Just three  of these were described as Hornet Coupes, like this 1932 Eustace Watkins example. One of that number was an Arrow Coupe (see Wolseley Hornet Specials no.41),  therefore without a sight of this car’s competition number, (carried on the front) it leaves two possible drivers for this entry, surprisingly both female. So it’s either Mrs M. Vaughn or Miss H. Astbury who is driving *X 9036 on the Stop/Restart test seen taking place here in a Hastings back street. (LATplate B9749 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.164

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

In 1934 MG introduced their Q Type racing car. Apparently, just eight were built and all were powered by the zoller-supercharged OHC 746 cc engine, a development of the Minor’s engine from 1928. While the original Minor engine developed just 20 bhp at 3500 rpm, it’s claimed that the Q Type unit could better 110bhp at 7200 rpm. These cars have lapped the outer circuit at Brooklands at 122 mph, a truly remarkable achievement. Here can be seen an example owned by the Bellvue Garage racing team from Wandsworth, S.W London and driven by Kenneth Evans. The photo was taken at Donington Park on 11th May 1935 by Bill Brunell.

( An apology – It has been pointed out that the second cutaway image that initially appeared here was of a 6-cylinder K3 and Not a Q Type. The caption editor has been fired!)

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.44

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1933 Windover Hornet fixed-head-coupe

The Windover coachbuilding concern were renown for the quality of their car bodies, the majority of their customers owning opulent up-market vehicles. The fixed-head-coupe body on a 1933 Wolseley Hornet Special chassis as seen here, perfectly illustrates this, particularly the well appointed interior of the car. While the body styling is unadventourous, its clean lines are pleasing on the eye. (Both images from The LAT Collection, courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.163

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This unidentified (perhaps VB 98**) MG Midget Sportsman’s Coupe is seen taking part in the 1931 running of the MG Car Club Trial. The driver was AS Curtis while the photographer was none other than the prolific Bill Brunell. What is interesting about this photo is that the coupe’s neatly designed sunshine roof is in the open position, the only such image in the archive. The front bumper was a non-standard fitment and does nothing for the looks of the car, while the trafficators and spotlight affixed to the ‘A’ pillar are further visual distractions. The large calormeter and wings coupled with the full-length sunvisor might indicate that Mr. Curtis enjoys embellishing his car. What is evident is the effectiveness of the rear-wing mud shield. This is simply an extention of the door. While mud and road dirt collect here, when the door is opened, it swings clear of the clothes of those entering or leaving the vehicle. (Is that a bird on the scuttle?)

Triple M corner no.162

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Despite its recent arrival on the scene, by the time this photo was taken (17th August 1935) the Donington circuit was already an established motor sport venue, having staged it’s first meeting race meeting just 30 months earlier. Its central location meant enthusiasts from the Midlands and North of England could now see the top drivers in action without the need to travel to the south-west of London and the Brooklands circuit to do so. The cars lined-up in this LAT collection photo (C7225) are taking part in the first event of the day, a five lap handicap. Eight cars were entered, just six made it to the start line and Ken Wharton’s  Austin Seven (no.33) rolled on the first corner, fortunately without injury to the driver. After this incident the race was won easily by D.S. Handley in his MGC’ Type Midget (no.30). A full report on the race and the rest of the meeting can be found on page 501 of the September 1935 edition of Motor Sport magazine. (Photo courtesy of Motorsport Images)