IOTW no.463

By | IOTW

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More Minor postcard images

Two more old postcard images featuring Minors. These photos are rarely exciting but they do depict the cars being used for the mainly mundane purposes for which they were originally purchased. The website’s archive now contains over 100 of these postcard shots, which cover the length and the breadth of the land and there are even one or two from outside the British Isles. There are a further two North Hill, Minehead, Somerset postcard images in the archive to compliment the one seen here, while the Ripon, Yorks market square scene is a ‘first’ for this town. Top – 1932 Minor Saloon along with a Standard Litte Nine . Beneath – 1933 Minor Two-seater.

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IOTW no.462

By | IOTW

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A motoring gymkhana

A proposal to hold a motoring gymkhana today would no doubt raise a few eyebrows, but they were not uncommon during the thirties decade. Henly’s Motor Group held an annual customer event each summer at Heston Airport while the Eastbourne concours d’élégance weekend also held an associated gymkhana. This photograph was taken in July 1931 at a similar event which on this occasion had been organised by the Bugatti Owners Club. The two (very recently) London registered vehicles involved are an MG Midget (GK 1284), seen here clearly leading a Bugatti (GK 17). The Midget’s driver is about to occupy, or be seated upon the the upturned bucket, although the purpose of the exercise remains a mystery to the writer. However, it does look like they are enjoying themselves!

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IOTW no.461

By | IOTW

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Regular contributor and Christchurch, New Zealand resident John McDonald, has sent this image of a care-worn ohc Minor Saloon 379-926, which in view of its paint job was probably taken between 1966 and 1969. John advises that the photo was taken in Dunedin on New Zealand’s South Island while the car’s likely owner was sure to be under 25 years of age! Apart from the red heart emblems painted upon the body, along with similarly coloured painted headlamp shells, the carburettor has also received a coat!

John has sent a correction to this post: “The Minor wears registration plates that were legal between 1956 to 30 June 1961. Secondly, the sticker in the top left of the windscreen is an annual one, to be displayed when the fee is paid. The blue/yellow one shown here was for the period 1/7/1960 to 30/6/1961. So I think the given date of 1960 is correct”.

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IOTW no.460

By | IOTW

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This Shetland Museum image depicts a Minor Fabric Saloon PS 775, a 1930 ‘Zetland’ registered car but a model built prior to the change from Smiths to Armstrong shock absorbers. The other visible clue that this is perhaps an early 1930 season car or even a late registration of a 1929 model is the continued presence of the ‘Morris’ script attached to the radiator core. Both of these changes occurring in very early October 1929 after which the radiator core remained naked. The girder-framed motorcycle will be familiar to some who read this but unfortunately not to the writer.

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IOTW no.459

By | IOTW

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RC 300 – 1931 registered McEvoy Minor

It was the Jensen bothers concern in West Bromwich, who on instructions from Michael McEvoy,  built the first McEvoy Minor (Model 70) body in the autumn of 1931. The car in question was to receive the Derby registration RC 300 and become something of a celebrity after it carried competition number 1 at the first ever RAC Rally in March 1932. Prior to that, McEvoy had heavily advertised the model in the Motor Sport magazine who in December 1931 had commissioned a photographer to take a sequence of at least seven photographs of the car for use in the forthcoming advertisements. One of these images was never used as the camera moved at the time the shutter was released, resulting in a blurring of the subsequent photo. Here this photograph sees the light of day for the first time, although little will be learned as much of the important detail is lost. Despite that, it remains an integral part of the car’s early history and is published here on that basis. (Photo courtesy of Motor Sport Images)

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IOTW no.458

By | IOTW

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Ken the Horse, Hawick

Postcards can be a great source for learning. It was this image of a 1932 Minor that led to a little internet research which uncovered the fascinating story outlined below. The Minor Saloon is about to pass the 1514 Memorial in Hawick, a town located just on the Scot’s side of the Anglo/Scottish border. The following passage has been extracted from the Ken the Horse website: This memorial commemorates the victory of local youths or “callants” from the town over a party of English raiders at Hornshole, just outside Hawick in 1514, most of the men of the town having been killed on Flodden Field the previous year. The English flag was captured and carried back to Hawick, the capture of which is commemorated in this proud statue.

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IOTW no.457

By | IOTW

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Water baby?

This photograph first appeared in the August 1936 edition of the Morris Owner magazine on page 561. The image caption reads as follows:

Mr J.H. Marshall, the Ilkley Motor Club’s President, demonstrates that a Minor Two-seater can cross the River Wharfe without bridge or ford. Just beyond where the car is standing is the deepest part of the stream.

It’s interesting to note that the Minor continued to be regularly mentioned in this journal right up to the commencement of WWII, demonstarting perhaps that it was a model the magazine’s editorial staff and its readership held in high esteem.

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IOTW no. 456

By | IOTW

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The latter days of an M Type?

It’s likely that this car started life as an MG M Type Midget before it was rebodied at some point, perhaps in the forties or fifties. Certainly, the front of the car bears all the hallmarks of the first MG Midget, despite the rear wheels originating from a Minor. Unfortunately, the reverse of this eBay sourced print provides no clues as to the car’s location but a detective would no doubt start his/her investigation in Douglas, I.O.M. The car is wearing a tax disc and is parked-up at what looks like a regular parking-bay so is almost certainly mobile, unlike many of these seaside photographer’s props of the period. Such a vehicle today would certainly attract the attention of the boys-in-blue, but perhaps not in pre-MOT days?

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IOTW no. 455

By | IOTW

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There is almost nothing to commend this photograph in that the subject’s face is obscured by her hand and the car’s identity will forever remain unknown due to the angle of the shot. Despite that, there is still plenty to be gleaned from the image. It was almost certainly taken prior to 1950 as the rooflines are yet to be disturbed by television aerials while the car is undoubtedly a 1932 season Morris Family Eight Sports Coupe, (to give it its full title), note the sidelights and calormeter.  The photograph was taken in Holmthwaite in what is now Cumbria, the sign on the wall providing the clue, confirmed by its listing on eBay from whence it was purchased. Just another small piece of Minor history to add to the archive.

IOTW no.455

By | IOTW

Click the image to see it full size.

There is almost nothing to commend this photograph in that the subject’s face is obscured by her hand and the car’s identity will forever remain unknown due to the angle of the shot. Despite that, there is still plenty to be gleaned from the image. It was almost certainly taken prior to 1950 as the rooflines are yet to be disturbed by television aerials while the car is undoubtedly a 1932 season Morris Family Eight Sports Coupe, (to give it its full title), note the sidelights and calormeter.  The photograph was taken in Holmthwaite in what is now Cumbria, the sign on the wall providing the clue, confirmed by its listing on eBay from whence it was purchased. Just another small piece of Minor history to add to the archive.

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