Triple M Corner no.196

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This LAT Collection image (C952) was taken on ‘Doverhay’  on 24th June 1933 during the BHMC’s Brighton-Beer Trial. Unfortunately, Cowbourne can not help identify the driver and passenger of MG no. 34 (ACD 134). Perhaps a Triple M enthusiast can oblige? (Courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Trople M corner no.195

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This scan of LATplate E9340 depicts an MG P Type Midget. A view from the front would help indicate if this is a PA version or the later PB type with the increased capacity engine. The PA was fitted with a honeycombe radiator while the PB version adopted the vertical slats as favoured by the stylists at that time. Perhaps an MG expert can positively identify the model from this profile view? (Photo courtesy Motorsport Images.)

Triple M corner no.194

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Brooklands was the venue for the 1932 JCC Annual Rally and High Speed Trial which took place on a very wet April day. Here an unidentified MG M Type Midget is followed by an Amilcar and a C Type Midget around a barrel marking an extremity of the makeshift course. The crews of all three cars are hunkered down in their cockpits in order to protect themselves from the worst of a torrential downpour. (LATplate B7596 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.193

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Brooklands played host to the BRDC 500 Mile Race on Saturday 24th September 1932. An open event, the race was run in the form of a handicap, with the smaller machines starting first, followed at differing intervals by the larger engine capacity classes. This artistic image from the race was created by Bryan de Grineau who produced similar representations on a weekly basis for The Motor magazine. Here two 746 cc MG Midgets, the red machine driven by R.T. Horton (see also TMC no.189), the light green car by Captain G.E.T. Eyston, are seen dicing high on the famous circuit’s raised banking. Horton’s car went on to win the race outright. (The plate was scanned from the Barre Lyndon book Combat, first published by Heinemann in 1933)

Triple M corner no.192

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The Abbey Coachworks in Merton, Surrey constructed some very stylish bodies during the early thirties, including this two-seater fixed-head sports coupe built upon a 1932 MG Magna chassis. (LATplate E2285 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.191

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This single seat MG C Type special, pictured in the Brooklands pits, was something of a sensation at the 1932 BRDC 500 Miles Race held in September that year. The car was driven R.T. Horton and J.H. Bartlett who eventually won this prestigious race, fighting off challenges from the likes of G.E.T. Eyston (MG), B. Lewis (Talbot) and Malcolm Campbell (Riley). The car covered the 500 miles in a time of 5 hours 42 minutes and 13 seconds at an average speed of 96.29 mph. Sadly the event is chiefly remembered for Clive Dunfee’s fatal crash in an 8 litre Bentley. (LATplate B9118 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.190

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Another TMC photo in a ten image sequence featuring 1931 MG Midget DG 2327. These photos were taken to illustrate an Autocar article on the virtues of the Isle-of-Man as a touring holiday destination for the mainland motorist. This photo, taken on the promenade in Douglas, features two of the horse drawn trams that were used to transport tourists and locals alike along that famous stretch of coastline.(LATplate E3920 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.189

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

EX 127

On 8th February 1932 Capt. G.E.T. Eyston along with Magic Midget EX 127 was at Pendine Sands on the Welsh south coast in an attempt to raise the Goup H ‘flying mile’ record to 120 mph. This, despite the fact that the weather and the condition of the sands were marginal, while Eyston himself was still recovering from serious burns suffered in an earlier record attempt. The target wasn’t achieved that day as the average speed over the each-way attempt was 118.39 mph, although EX127 did reach just over 120 mph on the outward leg. This image has been scanned from the book ‘Combat’, written by Barre Lyndon and published by William Heinemann in 1933. The aircraft seen in the image and mentioned in the caption is a DH 85 Leopard Moth.

Triple M corner no.188

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Sir Francis (F.B.H.) Samuelson was an enthusiastic MG campaigner in the early thirties competing in both Le Mans and Montlhery Midgets. His exploits in a Double-Twelve Le Mans Midget at the la Sarthe and Spa circuits in June 1930 are legendary. The photo seen here of Sir Francis and Freddie Kindell in car no. 29 is very well known and was taken on the eve of the 1930 Le Mans race, as was that of Murton Neale and Hicks in an identical car. (no. 28) Unfortunately, neither car featured among those finishing the race, with even a hint of shenanigans surrounding the failure of Samuelson’s car after just five hours. The Light Car’s report on the race can be found here. (LAT Autocar photoscan – courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.187

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The 1931 JCC Brooklands Double Twelve race held on the 8th & 9th May was an amazing success for the MG factory, although none of the cars entered carried official factory sponsorship! MG C Type Montlhery Midgets occupied the first five places in the overall standings (under a handicap system), while the the three Midgets entered by the Earl of March collected the team prize. Here another C Type (no.72) driven by R.R. Jackson receives frantic servicing attention in the Brooklands pits. Unfortunately, Jackson’s car failed to finish the race. Silent Pathe News film footage of  the race can be seen here. (LAT Autocar photoscan courtesy of Motor Sport Images)