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IOTW

IOTW no.554

By IOTW

1930 MCC ‘Exeter’

Here is a recently discovered Morris Minor saloon photograph from the LAT Collection (B5299), which was taken at the 1930 MCC London-Exeter Trial. The car’s competition number of 151 identifies it (via Cowbourne) as being driven by M. Longridge. The car’s registration is partialy obscured by mud or a badge and reads as GC 7?17, making it a London 1930 registration. It’s lack of a ‘Morris’ script on the radiator would indicate that it’s a 1930 season car, although it’s impossible from this head-on shot to determine whiich of the two  saloon versions this one is. Unfortunately for Mr. Longridge, he had to retire the car and therefore did not gain an award. (Courtesy of Motorsport Images)

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IOTW no.553

By IOTW

Wagner again

T. Wagner competed in Morris Minors from the spring of 1933 until immediately prior to the commencement of the Second World War. His first Minor was a 1933 Two-seater model (KJ 9509), while his first recorded event was the Scottish Six Days Trial held in May of that year. After this his name crops up regularly among the results of the national reliability trials of the period.  Photographs of his second Minor, a 1934 Two-seater (OY 8787), also appeared from time to time in the motoring magazines . While perhaps not the best known Morris Minor personality of the period, he was certainly a regular competitor and judging by his results, was also a very capable driver. Here he is seen competing in the 1934 London – Gloucester Trial ‘ somewhere in the Cotswolds’. (LATplate C5804 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

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IOTW no.552

By IOTW

Unless you are an enthusiast or own classic or vintage cars, it’s doubtful that you would deliberately include a car ‘in shot’  if you were taking a family photograph today. In the thirties, the opposite seems to have been the case. Back then, the family car was captured on film at every opportunity. Here, a ten or eleven year old boy dressed in full school uniform has been posed alongside the family’s 1929 Portsmouth registered Morris Minor Fabric Saloon (TP 7975).  The Minor itself is only noteworthy for its spotlight and non standard horn, although the luck associated with the horseshoe affixed to the radiator may well have been called upon from time to time to compensate for the car’s totally bald front tyres! This damaged snapshot has no caption on its reverse  and was a recent eBay purchase.

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IOTW no.551

By IOTW

Wolseley Hornet Saloon

The launch of the Wolseley Hornet in April 1930 was a huge event at the time. The intense public and media interest was not due to the cars appearance as its body was already a familar site and shared with the Morris Minor, the Morris product having been launched some 18 months previously. No, this  excitement was due to the compact 1271 cc, six-cylinder OHC engine designed for this model. This ‘head-on’ LAT photoscan view does reveal the narrow track it shared with the Minor but not its elongated bonnet, under which sat the extended Minor engine. (Photo courtesy of Motorsport Images) 

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IOTW 550

By IOTW

1933 SSDT

The May 1933 running of the Scottish Six Days Trial (SSDT) encompassed some of Scotland’s most beautiful scenary. Although not apparent from this edited extract of LAT plate C317, H.F. Barge‘s 1931 SV Tourer (JO 2231) is seen climbing away from the village of Inverfarigaig on the shores of Loch Ness, leaving General Wades Military Road (B582) far behind. (Courtesy of Motorsport Images)

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IOTW no.549

By IOTW

WE 5586

1929 Morris Minor saloon (WE 5586) was first registered in Sheffield, as was WE 7511 but some time later the following year. UD 3335 is aso a 1930 registration, although originating in Oxford. The photograph was one of a miscellaneous batch of five recently acquired via eBay.  The concise caption on its the rear reads as follows, “Morris Minor, Marmon Straight Eight and Essex Terraplane”. Nothing else is known.

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IOTW no.548

By IOTW

T. Wagner

T. Wagner successfully campaigned his Two-seater Minors (’33 model KJ 9509 & ’34 model OY 8787) between 1933 and 1938, appearing in many events and regularly featuring among the top award winners throughout that period. Here he is photographed in June 1938 while taking part in the MCC’s London-Edinburgh trial, driving (according to Cowbourne) a 908cc (sic) Minor Two-seater. This image was taken from a recently discovered cache of ‘Motor’ 35mm negatives held in the LAT Collection. (Photo courtesy of Motorsport Images)

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IOTW no.547

By IOTW

Autumn 1939

An unidentified 1931 SV Morris Minor Coachbuilt Saloon is seen here queuing for fuel shortly after the annoucement of the declaration of war on 3rd September 1939. Petrol ration books were distributed to U.K. car owners on 8th September, with rationing coming into force on the 15th. The owner of the Morris Eight saloon behind the Minor has already painted his front wings in line with HM Government advice, although none of cars on view have as yet fitted shrouds to one of their headlamps. This Motor image looks to have been taken in one of London’s new Metroland suburbs, perhaps in Surrey or Middlesex. (LAT collection 35mm Motor negative – courtesy of Motorsport Images)

 

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I(s)OTW no.546

By IOTW

Sir George Kenning (knighted in 1943) was the founder of what was to become the Kenning Motor Group. He was a larger than life character who helped shape a change in the way cars were sold in the U.K. He was photographed here in 1929 alongside a Morris Minor Fabric Saloon. Perhaps better known is the early 1931 photo as used in the Morris Owner magazine and the national press of Sir George driving a £100 Minor to promote the new model.

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I(s)OTW no.545

By IOTW

Two magazines – same image

January 1930 editions of both the Light Car and Morris Owner featured the same image depicting a 1929 season Morris Minor Fabric Saloon behind which a small outboard motor powered craft had been towed to the water’s edge. While both captions mention Durban, South Africa as being the venue, the Morris Owner heads-up its piece ‘With a Minor at the Cape’ despite Durban being located in what was Natal Province, some considerable distance from the cape area.

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I(s)OTW no.544

By IOTW

In the main just a single image adorned the cover of The Light Car & Cycle Car (later shortened to the Light Car) magazine throughout the thirties decade. However, many photos of the selected subject vehicle were taken and the rejected shots eventually found their way into the magazine’s archive alongside the chosen image. Here is one such example. The editor wanted a suitable photo for the magazine’s 10th November 1933 edition to commemorate ‘Poppy Day’. He selected this photo of a 1934 Minor Saloon but consigned the people-less photo of the car and war memorial to the archive. (LAT Motor plate 714-10 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

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I(s)OTW no.543

By IOTW

On the cover…

The Morris Minor featured many times on the covers of the weekly motoring magazines, primarily between 1929 and 1932. Here are two Light Car and Cyclecar covers from 1929, one of which is an advertisement placed by Morris Motors, the other featuring  XV 9071, a Temple Press company car used from time to time by motororing journalist, Harold Hastings. Fabric Saloon XV 9071 was first registered in London in late 1928 and went on to feature on the cover of the magazine on three further occasions, in April 1929, November 1930 and finally in April 1931.

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IOTW no.542

By IOTW

1932/3 Wolseley Hornet Sports Coupe

As mentioned in this spot on a previous occasion, this style of Sports Coupe body was very much in vogue between 1932 and 1935. Most large scale/high volume car manufacturers (with the exception of Ford) produced such a model, all of which had a very similar shape. This model from Wolseley, (unsurprisingly) closely resembled the Sports Coupe offerings from Morris Motors and no doubt shared many parts.

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IOTW no.541

By IOTW

Here is another eBay sourced post-war snapshot of a Minor that has seen far better days. GT 1993, a September 1931 London County Council registered car is wearing ‘L’ plates and is showing clear signs of wear and tear. The 1932 Minor Two-seater has a patched-up hood and paintwork that hasn’t seen polish for some time, although the front tyres appear to be in good condition. It doesn’t look as if the car survived the introduction of the MOT Test in the early sixties, as nothing is recorded on the DVLA database.

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IOTW no.540

By IOTW

Yet another IOTW from across the globe, sourced (once again) by John McDonald from Christchurch, New Zealand. This present-day image of an almost derelict 1933 Morris Minor Saloon is from a local NZ website, the site owner being an avid Austin Seven enthusiast. There are two further images and it’s possible to count at least six Austin Sevens, all kept undercover in barns. The Minor however has been left in the open, exposed to the elements, crying out to be rescued.

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IOTW(s) no.539

By IOTW

GY 8404

IOTW no.538 (see archive) also shows an image of this 1932 Morris Minor Saloon taken in the early post war years. This second glass plate scan was taken around the same period and shows the car alongside a 1934 Minor Saloon variant (BNO 505) and the family’s beautiful Lagonda sports saloon. Sadly, BNO 505 is not currently recorded on the DVLA database although GY 8404 is mentioned there, albeit nothing is known post 1990. Ken Martin does have a photo of GY 8404 (reproduced here with thanks) which was taken in 1987 at the Morris Register’s Stanford Hall rally. It seems likely therefore that the car has survived as it looked well cared for just three years prior to its last recorded DVLA mention. Is the current whereabouts of this Minor known by anyone?

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IOTW no.538

By IOTW

GY 8404

This image was scanned from one of two glass plates recently purchased via eBay. The 1932 Morris Minor Two-door Saloon (GY 8404) was first registered in London in June of that year. The photograph was almost certainly taken in the late forties or early fifties, as the toy Jeep is emblazoned with the motif ‘GB 1946’ on its bonnet. The car heading-up this unusual four vehicle queue is an elegant mid to late thirties Lagonda sports saloon while the last mode of transport in the line-up is a self-propelled, arm powered, foot steered go-cart. The Minor survived at least until August 1990 according to the DVLA.  More on this car in the next IOTW edition.

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IOTW no.537

By IOTW

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Bound for Spain

Dick Weekes (aka Kemble on this website’s forum) took his 1933 Morris Minor Saloon (UN 6573) to Spain in 1960. After travelling through France, this scenic photograph was taken as he approached the Spanish boarder.

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IOTW no.536

By IOTW

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This charming image of a 1929-31 OHC Morris Minor Tourer was a recent eBay purchase. The photo had been carefully mounted and framed, thus ensuring that the print was maintained in good condition. A close examination of the photo reveals that the car has been well-kept and is fitted with the early wheel centres as used on 1929 and 1930 season models, although no other form of  vehicle identification is visible. The mature lady behind the wheel is presumably the young boys aunt or grandmother?

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IOTW no.535

By IOTW

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N.Z. homebuilt

Yet another interesting photograph from ‘Networker’ John McDonald in Christchurch, New Zealand. This one depict a 1929 OHC Minor that has seen far better days! The shot was probably taken in the late fifties or early sixties when these cars became affordable to students and others on an extremely limited budget. The homemade body and Magna wheels can’t disguise the car’s origins as the radiator, front wings and OHC Minor engine can all clearly be seen.

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IOTW no.534

By IOTW

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Minehead NCP Car Park mid-thirties

This postcard image of part of the Minehead, Somerset shoreline looks likely to have been taken on a busy weekend during the holiday season. The Morris Minor Two-seater approaching the NCP car park (Parking Fee 6d) is UN 6109 a late 1932 Denbigh registered vehicle. Other car registrations indicate that tourists have travelled from as far afield as Berkshire, Birmingham and the Black Country to visit the Somerset resort. Just out of shot is the terminus to the railway serving the town which at this time was operated by the GWR. The line closed under the Beeching cuts in 1971, re-opening for tourist traffic in 1976 as the West Somerset Railway.

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IOTW no.533

By IOTW

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South London – late thirties

This photo was first published in the 10th March 1939 edition of The Autocar, appearing in an article  related to driving instruction and the taking of the driving test. Here a learner driver under tuition is seen on a busy South London high road passing a parked 1932 Morris Minor 5 cwt van (HN 8545), sign written as being owned by a Norbury, SW16 electrical contractor, A.E. Cox Radio. The photo looks to have been taken in high summer, possibly in 1938, making the Minor van six years old at the time this photo is likely to have been taken. The photo begs a couple of questions – How did a Darlington registered vehicle end up in South London and did the van survive the forthcoming conflict? (Autocar photoscan courtesy of Motorsport Images)

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IOTW no.532

By IOTW

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MY 7336

It would be wrong to suggest that this thirties snapshot of a 1930 Morris Minor Saloon is in any way exceptional.  It isn’t, in that like so many photos of family cars of the period, it was taken at the roadside where a picnic is under way.  The car has an occupant, although the individuals gender is not clear. The Minor (it could be either a Fabric or Coachbuilt saloon) was first registered in Middlesex. This image came via Hugh Barnes (Orstin) with thanks.

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IOTW no.531

By IOTW

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Workhorse

John McDonald submitted this evocative late fifties or early sixties image of a 1932 Morris Minor Saloon. The photo was taken in the Te Urewera region of North Island, New Zealand, the Minor being refuelled outside the local general store.  The car was approaching 30 years old at this time and was showing signs of its age. It had clearly been worked hard of late as the fully laden trailor and flattened rear springs illustrate.

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IOTW no.530

By IOTW

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OV 4995

This 1931 Birmingham registered Morris Minor Two-seater could be some distance from home. The photo is captioned ‘St. Bartholomew’s  Church, Leigh litch gate’, Leigh being in the county of Surrey some 140 miles south east of England’s second city. The assortment of wheels and general appearance of the vehicle might also be indicative of when the photo was taken – perhaps as late as the fifties.

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IOTW no.529

By IOTW

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A Manxed ‘M’

Many pre-war ‘open’ cars were the recipients of new homebuilt bodies in the austere post war years of the late forties and fifties. By now most of these cars were approaching 25 years old and their original timber framed bodies had seen far better days. This Surrey registered 1931 MG Midget PL 5390 had acquired such a body, styled with sharply cut-away doors, a flat windscreen and a docked tail, thus imitating the J and P type Midgets that followed the M Type’, although losing its louvered front valance somewhere along the way.

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IOTW no.528

By IOTW

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JO 764 December 1930

One of the pre-launch photo-shoots for the new (for 1931) S.V. Morris Minor Two-seater (JO 764) was conducted in awful weather conditions somewhere in the Oxfordshire countryside. Here the car is stopped at a road junction during what looks to have been a downpour, the vacuum wiper clearly (or should that be unclearly!) not doing its job. The LAT archive holds a sequence of images taken that day which must have been a miserable one for the photographer. (LATplate Red 9060 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

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IOTW no.527

By IOTW

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PO 4843

This is one of a sequence of six images of PO 4843 purchased as a single lot on eBay in December 2012. Three have featured here previously but not this shot of the car and its owner’s wife or girlfriend. ‘Jerry’ is a 1932 Morris Minor Two-seater, first registered in West Sussex in late 1931. As none of the six prints are captioned we can only speculate as to how it was so named and just when these photographs were taken. What can’t be denied is that like this particular image, they all possess a certain period charm.

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IOTW no.526

By IOTW

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UP 4835

This lovely image featuring a 1930 Durham registered MG Midget (UP 4835) was purchased on eBay recently. The photo was taken at Stybarrow Crag, Ullswater and bears the stamp on its reverse of Fox Photos Ltd., of Tudor Street, London EC4, the firm’s premises being located within a stones throw of Fleet Street. Unfortunately, there is no indication as to which publication the image was eventually destined to appear. The good news is that this car survives and according to the DVLA was last taxed in 2007. The Triple M Register are investigating.

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I(s)OTW no.525

By IOTW

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AXV 98

Mike Tebbett forwarded the upper images of 1934 Morris Minor Saloon (AXV 98) along with the following comment “AXV 98, taken by me circa 1971…. Appalling quality, sorry…..This was at a Monmouthsire farm where I bought a vintage Minor in pieces that had been a van. The latter was soon sold on to Rosemary Burke and her husband as I was still student and had no money! AXV seems to still exist, do you know of it? “ Fortunately, the archive holds a series of images of the now re-bodied vehicle, which at that time was located in Scotland and was auctioned on eBay in July 2016. Where it resides now is anyone’s guess?

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I(s)OTW no.524

By IOTW

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GX 6859

These two images (submitted by David Saunders) show a March 1932 London registered Morris Minor Two-seater special (GX 6859). The photos, which were believed to have been taken in the late sixties or early seventies, are of a vehicle that survives to this day. The car has been the subject of  some speculation in recent years as to its origins. David describes it as a Jarvis bodied Minor special and the body tub has a rounded rump and door shape which are similar in design to that seen on the 1930-31 Jarvis bodied Mg Midget.

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IOTW no.523

By IOTW

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This official looking Morris photograph of a Minor Four-door Saloon was found in glass plate format within the LAT archive. It depicts an early production or pre-production 1934 model, the non-sloping radiator guard providing the visual clue along with the plate’s reference number, which places it in August or September of 1933. Just 2075 long-wheel-base Minor Saloons found customers in the 1934  season, almost exactly half the quantity built in the model’s first  year (1932) when 4029 were constructed. The lwb saloon fared significantly better than the lwb Special Coupe which recorded sales of just 47 units during the 1934 season. (LATplate E3763 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

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IOTW no.522

By IOTW

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Morris Minor Two-seater JO 764

This is an unusual photo snippet of the £100 Minor development car (JO 764)  in that the hood is folded away in its bag while the side-screens remain in position. Despite the publicity surrounding the launch of the model and the huge public interest that followed, the 1931 S.V. Two-seater found just 1455 customers over the seven months it remained in production.

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IOTW no.521

By IOTW

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1932 Cunard Calshot

This is a pre-restoration shot of 1932 Cunard Calshot MU 6066. The Calshot was built by the Cunard Coachworks in Acton, West London and was based upon a 1932 long-wheel-base Minor chassis, which at that time was powered by the OHC engine. The Cunard busines was a wholly owned subsidiary of London Morris main dealers, Stewart & Ardern who exclusively marketed the model.  The image seen here was taken when the car was in the ownership of David Saunders.  Hopefully, a photo shoot involving all three survivors can be arranged when the ongoing restoration of MU 6066 is completed.

PS The MG TA in the background (DON 523) was first registered by Birmingham CBC in November 1937.

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IOTW no.520

By IOTW

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YD 4198

Side valve chassis SV 13467 left Cowley at the end of February 1932 and was shipped to the Jensen Brother’s coachworks in West Bromwich.  It was then fitted with one of their new 2+2 McEvoy special bodies and registered by Somerset County Council as YD 4198 shortly afterward. This photo was taken in 1971 when the car was in the ownership of James Peacop in Cheshire, remaining in his custodianship until 2017 when it was sold at a Brightwell’s auction, achieving a record sale price for a pre-war Minor. Sitting behind the McEvoy is 1930 Minor Tourer EC 6065, which at that time was extensively campaigned by Jim in VSCC trials events. This photo appears here courtesy of Mike Adams who owns the Jensen/McEvoy section of the Harry Edwards archive.

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IOTW no.519

By IOTW

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Light Car cover images

The Light Car magazine (The Light Car & Cyclecar until the autumn of 1933)  was a hugely successful publication throughout the thirties, but particularly in the years 1930-1934, the period prior to the launch of the Practical Motorist magazine. It’s full page cover photographs regularly featured cars loaned by manufacturers for road tests and launch articles, the black & white imagery contrasting with the magazines colour title-banner, selected from a range of red, orange, green, blue & yellow. The differing colours may have had some significance not apparent to the writer. Here a 1932 Swallow bodied Wolseley Hornet Two-seater has been photographed at the roadside, a short distance from the Cherhill White Horse in a beautiful Wiltshire setting.

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IOTW no.518

By IOTW

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UN 1579

Although the quality of this image leaves much to be desired it does portray a very early Morris Minor Tourer. UN 1579 was first registered in Denbigh in the autumn of 1928 very soon after the first Minors started leaving the Cowley plant. The reverse of the image has (another) one word caption, “Cardiff”.  The K2 phoneboxes in the background don’t help to date the photograph as they were first introduced in 1924, while the cobbled roadways may indicate that the timing was earlier rather than later in the Thirties decade.

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IOTW no.517

By IOTW

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WL 9243

This eBay postcard shows Oxford registered 1931 Minor Coachbuilt Saloon (WL 9243) parked outside of the Hotel Abington. The internet reveals that there are two Abingtons’ in the U.K., one located in South Lanarkshire, Scotland the other in Northamptonshire, England. With the car’s registration the only visual clue, it’s likely that this photo was taken in Abington, Northants. (South Cambridgeshire has two Abingtons, although they are prefixed by the words ‘Great’ and ‘Little’ respectively.

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IOTW no.516

By IOTW

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Worthing Minor

Featuring here this week are two family snapshops of a pre 31 season OHC Minor Coachbuilt Saloon. Just a single word caption appears on the reverse of both photos – ‘Worthing’. Very little else of substance can be gleaned from either image, other than it’s clear that the husband is a better photographer than his wife, or at least has a far steadier hand!

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IOTW no.515

By IOTW

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VX 7908

This 1931 season Minor Coachbuilt Saloon was first registered in Chelmsford, Essex towards the tail-end of 1930. The revised bumper brackets were new for that season as were the strengthened wheel centres, although that type is not evident in this snapshot. The Minor is definitely showing signs of its age, indicating perhaps that the photo may well have been taken in the post-war years. Thanks to Mike Tebbett for forwarding this charming image and also to Bruce Dowell for permitting its use.

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IOTW no.514

By IOTW

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1933 Hornet Coupe

Yet another eBay find, this time an April 1933 London registered Wolseley Hornet Coupe (AGT 574). It’s likely that the proud owner of what looks to be a newish car is operating the camera shutter on this shot, his family firmly ensconced in the comfortable cabin. These coupe models were extremely well equipped and sold for £245, a full £47 more than the standard saloon model.

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I(s)OTW no.513

By IOTW

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The White Minor (again!)

Thanks to the Harry Edwards Archive, yet more information is now available concerning the post-war history of the White Minor Skinner Special. After it was sold by John Bolster it changed hands on at least six occasions during the late fifties and early sixties. One such owner was a W.G.A. Davies who lived in Shooters Hill in South East London and it’s him we must thank for these interesting photos taken in either 1961 or 1962. At this time the car was fitted with an 1172 cc Ford E93A S.V. engine. As can be seen, the car’s dash panel differs significantly from its pre-war racing days with a motley array of instruments, some from the early thirties and others of later origin. The original Hartford shock absorbers have also gone to be replaced by post war telescopic units. It’s hoped that a future article in the Minor Musings series can fully detail the chronology of the car’s ownership in the post war years.

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IOTW no.512

By IOTW

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1934 season Minor 5 cwt van advertisement – Fish Trades Gazette

The Network’s archive contains very few advertisements, or promotional material of any stype, for the Minor 5 cwt van, something of a failing, as the 5 cwt van was the second only to the Minor Saloon in the sales stakes.  This recently sourced advertisement for a 1934 season model (with eddy free front!) goes a little way towards correcting that anomoly. It’s interesting to see that Morris Motors trawled the business journals (an awful pun – apologies) to find suitable periodicals in which to advertise their Light Vans.

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IOTW no.511

By IOTW

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PS 782

The PS (Zetland) sequence of registrations was of long duration, commencing in January 1904 and concluding in 1964 with PS 4080. This 1929 Minor Fabric Saloon (PS 782) was one of just 54 vehicles registered on Zetland that year and looks to be in excellent condition, so perhaps a recent arrival from the mainland. The two men featured (almost certainly brothers) are very smartly dressed for a forthcoming formal occasion or maybe just for the photograph. (A Shetland Museum photo)

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I(s)OTW no.510

By IOTW

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Archive gems

The LAT Collection contains a host of motoring treasures, many of which haven’t seen the light of day for decades. An early visit in 2012 to Haymarket’s Teddington, Middx base (at that point Haymarket were the custodian’s of the LAT Collection), unearthed these three photographs, all of which appeared in the Light Car & Cyclecar magazine in the autumn of 1928. They were discovered in a neglected folder and all had the Light Car & Cyclecar stamp on their reverse side. They show images of the very recently released Morris Minor Fabric Saloon which (almost certainly) was one of the early development cars, as these photos reveal a number of features that were absent from production models. (Light Car Photoscans courtesy of Motorsport Images)

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I(s)OTW no.509

By IOTW

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1929 Morris Minor Tourer RM 6065

This quartet of snapshots was a recent eBay purchase, all of which depict a Cumberland registered 1929 built Minor Tourer (RM 6065) with family members posing alongside. Three are captioned with the names of the individuals in shot and the portrait image mentions that it was “taken near Grasmere”.  The shot of the car with a male at the wheel enables the viewer to see the flat bottom to the bonnet side, along with the solid nickel radiator, both of which changed at chassis no. 14456, thus confirming its ‘early’ status.

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IOTW no.508

By IOTW

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1933 Wolseley Hornet Coupe

This scan of a heavily retouched Autocar column header from a February 1933 edition of the magazine shows one of the new Wolseley Hornet Coupe bodied cars, a style that was very much in vogue at that time. A plethora of British manufacturers, including Morris, Austin, Lanchester, Rover and Wolseley all produced examples of these highly stylised coupe bodied models, described by Morris as Sports/Special Coupes. Singer bucked the trend and produced an elegant two-door coupe for their Nine, choosing not to disfigure its shapely lines by the use of dummy pramhood irons. This posed shot was taken on an airfield where one of the DeHavilland DH 60 Gypsy Moth aircraft was parked alongside. (LAT photoscan courtesy of Motorsport Images)

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I(s)OTW no. 507

By IOTW

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Minor rumours and speculation

News of a new model from a major car manufacturer creates quite a stir today, particularly in the motoring press. Much speculation takes place and grainy ‘spy’ photos of heavily disguised cars are published with paint schemes aimed at breaking-up the car’s outline. The motoring magazines then put together their own ‘artist impressions’ taken from the spy photos and these are then analysed by their experts. In the twenties and thirties much the same took place, although without quite the razzmatazz seen today. Here are two images that illustrate that point. In the spring of 1928 rumours concerning the forthcoming baby car from Morris Motors were rife. Just prior to the first official photos being released in June, The Autocar released their own impression of what the car was likely to look like. Thankfully, they were way off beam as this awful mocked-up photo shows. Later, in February 1930 news was circulating among the motoring journals of a new small six-cylinder car from Morris. On this occasion, The Autocar‘s mock-up was almost spot-on in terms of appearance, except that the car they depicted was badged as a Morris. When the new ‘six’ did appear just two months later, it of course carried a Wolseley motif on its radiator.

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IOTW no.506

By IOTW

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GN 5195

This snapshot of an early 1931 London registered Minor Coachbuilt Saloon (GN 5195) is another recent eBay purchase. As this OHC Minor was leaving the end of the production line, the very first ‘utility’ SV Minors  were beginning to find customers.  The dilemma facing some prospective Minor customers (and perhaps this one as well) was not just about which engine type to select for powering their new acquisition, but what that final model choice may say about them and their aspirations? Of course model ‘price’ will have been a very significant factor but the prospect of driving a visibly utilatarian model versus a model with chrome ancillaries, bumpers and a (limited) colour choice will have swayed some to find the extra money and buy the OHC version, or perhaps to simply walk around the corner and see what was on offer at their nearest Austin Seven dealer! No heart or head choices to be made there.

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IOTW no.505

By IOTW

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PN 7459 1931 SV Minor

PN 7459 was the subject of a short feature by Harry Edwards in the summer 1981 edition of the Morris Register’s ‘Journal’ magazine. The photograph seen here was scanned for the archive from a box file loaned to me by Ken Martin following Harry’s death. The car’s story is an interesting one in that it was converted from a 1931 Minor van to a special in 1937 utilising some of the van’s bodywork in its construction. The original article and more photographs can be found by following this link.

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IOTW no.504

By IOTW

Blazing a trail with a Minor.

These two images were scanned from a recently acquired August 1930 edition of the Morris Overseas Mail magazine. They immediately struck a chord as the Australian Minor Roadster and its journey into the Australian bush was familiar to me. Upon checking the archive I found two further references to this expedition. The first was a short article in a May 1930 edition of The Autocar, the second being a full length article from the August 1935 edition of The Morris Owner. As to why the magazine published the article a full year after the Minor ceased production and five years after it took place is mystifying. The article however bears witness to the ruggedness of the Minor’s running gear under what were atrocious conditions. The 1935 Morris Owner article can be read by following the link below. (Chris Lambert – November 2019)

MO Blazing a trail with a Minor August 1935

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IOTW no.503

By IOTW

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Calcutta – Spring 1930

This cutting is from the August 1930 edition of The Morris Overseas Mail magazine and shows the comparatively rare sight of a Minor Saloon on the sub-continent. The two brief paragraphs of text accompanying the image tells of Mr Whittacker’s satisfaction with the model and its achievements in Calcutta’s busy traffic. He claims that his Fabric Saloon has a top-speed of 53 mph and regularly achieves 47 mpg. Keeping a fabric skinned car in sub-tropical conditions must surely have taxed those charged with maintaining the integrity of the body. It’s known that in the tip of the North Island in New Zealand birds used the flock beneath the skin of imported Fabric Saloons as nest lining material. Similar issues may have also occurred in India.

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IOTW no.502

By IOTW

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Family lane-side picnic circa 1930

Period images featuring families sharing a summer afternoon’s picnic alongside their cars are anything but rare. An image search on Google or a trawl through eBay will reveal many of this genre. However, few are as well composed or photographed as this example. Here, the occupants of two cars, perhaps an extended family, have assembled by the roadside to consume their picnic on a beautiful summer day. In the large late twenties saloon (1928 Morris Cowley) sits the matriarch while her kith and kin are seated on the grass around her. The 1929 season Minor Fabric Saloon may be owned by the photographer who has captured this late twenties/early thirties middle-class idyll for posterity. (Image via Ken Martin)

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IOTW no.501

By IOTW

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Peter Skinner (again)

Following on from IOTW no.500, this image shows the elder of the Skinner siblings wrestling his car around the Lower ‘S’ at Shelsley Walsh in 1938. According to contemporary reports, the 4.2 litre Hudson engined special was exceedingly quick along the straights, while testing the driver’s abilities to the full on the corners. It’s interesting to note that in 1938 crash helmets were required to be worn under the regulations, while for most of the thirties this wasn’t the case. (LAT ‘Motor’ film courtesy of Motorsport Images)

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IOTW no.500

By IOTW

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Peter Skinner & the Red Skinner Special

This superb portrait of Peter Skinner was taken at Shelsley Walsh in September 1938. By this time his Red Minor Skinner Special had been radically altered by the installation of a Hudson Straight Eight power unit of 4168 cc developing 138 bhp. It’s not easy to ascertain just how much of the original Morris Minor was retained at this point but the likelihood is that it was very little. His sister Barbara, also competed in the same car at this event. (LAT Photo C15901 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

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IOTW no. 499

By IOTW

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HX 8980 1931 Morris Minor Semi-Sports

Although officially a 1931 season car, far greater numbers of the £125 Morris Minor Semi-Sports (two-seat) model were constructed and sold in the period late August to late December 1930 than in the following eight-months to August 1931. This was almost entirely due to the introduction of the S.V. £100 Minor Two-seater just before the Christmas holiday in December 1930, its £25 price advantage seriously denting sales of the Semi-Sports model.  This Middlesex registered car, however, carries a registration plate (HX 8980) of a sequence that was issued between 1933 and 1939, which suggests that it was re-registered at some point, post 1933. Thanks goes to Keith Durston for unearthing this photo of his friend Ginger Marshall and brother, which was probably taken in the late forties/early Fifties. The car survives and is currently in the custodianship of Daniel Redmond.

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IOTW no.498

By IOTW

Here is a snapshot of a late 1931 or early 1932 MG Midget which is identifiable by its sculptured wings and short boot lid. What is not clear from this image is if the car is fabric skinned or one of the ‘new’ metal panelled variants. Folklore has it that all short boot lid cars were of the metal panelled variety as MG were keen to clear old stocks of the fabric skinned version. Certainly, their pricing for the 1932 season reflected this with the fabric skinned car being listed at £165 while the new panelled body versions were priced at £185. Could it be possible that Carbodies were supplying MG with short boot lid versions of both the panelled and fabric skinned cars? Is there evidence to say that this is not the case? PS Stowing the spare wheel on the tail was not a standard feature offered by the company.

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IOTW no.499

By IOTW

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HX 8980 1931 Morris Minor Semi-Sports

Although officially a 1931 season car, far greater numbers of the £125 Morris Minor Semi-Sports models were constructed and sold in the period late August to late December 1930 than in the following eight month period. This was almost entirely due to the introduction of the S.V. £100 Minor Two-seater just before the Christmas holiday in December 1930.  This Middlesex registered car however, sports a registration plate (HX 8980) of a sequence that was issued in the period between 1933 and 1939, which suggests that it was re-registered at some point post 1933. Thanks goes to Keith Durston for unearthing this photo of his friend Ginge Marshall and brother, which was probably taken in the late forties/early Fifties. The car survives and is currently in the custodianship of Daniel Redmond.

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IOTW no.496

By IOTW

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A Midget in Scotland

This photo featured as a full page item in the 15th October 1934 edition of The Autocar. The two 1932 London registered cars are a BSA Three-wheeler GW 4646 and GX 803  an MG Midget. Clearly on a touring holiday, the two cars are parked-up alongside the beautiful Loch Tulla in Argyll almost 500 miles distant from their London base, with their crews dressed in full-length leather coats as protection against the weather, despite the season appearing to be late spring or summer. GX 803 appeared in a number of Autocar published photos between 1932 and 1934, including one in John o’Groats, perhaps taken while on this same trip. (LAT Autocar photoscan – courtesy of Motorsport Images)

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IOTW no.495

By IOTW

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Shifnal Postcard

Unusual though it may seem, it isn’t the first time that a cottage hospital has featured in an IOTW photo with a pre-war Minor parked outside. Here, JW 1624 a 1932 Wolverhampton registered Two-seater is parked-up adjacent to the Shifnal, Salop CH while posing for this recently purchased thirties Valentine’s postcard. The car’s driver is wearing a wide-brimmed hat, which in an open car,  is a particularly risky practice!

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IOTW no.494

By IOTW

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A late 1929 (’30 season) Morris Minor Fabric Saloon plays second fiddle in this eBay sourced photograph to the larger Lanchester or Diamler saloon around which this family are posing. The Minor (KD 7***) was first registered in Liverpool while the big saloon carries a 1932 Wallasey, Cheshire plate. The occasion looks like it was the start or the end of a family holiday, the suitcases on the luggage rack providing the clue, while the large three storey ‘Lindow House’ hints at the family’s status in the community.

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I(s)OTW no.493

By IOTW

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RV 4507 & KLM 932

Yet more eBay sourced snapshot images of a Minor. These shots of 1934 Minor Two-seater RV 4507 were taken post war, the styling  and 1949 London registration of the second car in shot providing the clues. The cars are parked-up outside a rural 1920’s built villa, perhaps in Surrey or Hampshire, the Minor carrying an early 1934 Portsmouth plate. The identity of the second car was something of a revelation, as it is a 1949 Invicta Black Prince KLM 932 of which just six of the DHC version (seen here) were made. The company had manufactured high performance cars in the pre-war years but had ceased trading in 1938.  The marque name was resurrected in 1946 at premises in Virginia Water, Surrey but a total of just 16 Black Prince cars found customers before the business was sold to AFN, builders of Frazer Nash cars and military equipment. Neither car registration is logged on the DVLA database.

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IOTW no.492

By IOTW

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1929 Morris Minor Fabric Saloon

Another recent eBay purchase, this unidentifiable 1929 Fabric Saloon snapshot gives away very few visual clues. That it is a 1929 season car can be deduced from the parallel bonnet-side bottom edge and the significantly smaller rear windows than those of the 1930 season cars. The wheels have been re-painted a lighter colour than the factory black, which may indicate that the car was photographed toward the middle of the thirties decade, while the daisies or buttercups suggests that the photo was taken beween the end of April and late June.

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I(s)OTW no. 491

By IOTW

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Portmadoc Postcards

These two postcards, both taken in the Thirties, depict what could be considered mundane views of the north western Welsh town of Portmadoc – now Porthmadog. One being taken in Station Road, the other in the town’s High Street. They are at least of some interest to those of us here in that both photos include a Minor. The 1932 Two-seater (FM 7086) parked at a jaunty angle in Station Road was first registered in Chester in late 1931, a town some 70 miles distant. The registration of the 1934 Minor Saloon is indistinct but with around 80,000 Minors on Britains roads at this time they would have been a very familiar site in every town across the country.

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IOTW no.490

By IOTW

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RX 6636

There is nothing at all exceptional about this postcard of a corner of Market Place in Wantage, Berks. A photograph taken today from the same spot would show how little the buildings have changed in the intervening 90 years, although there would be many more cars in shot than just this solitary 1930 Wolseley Hornet saloon, carrying a Berkshire registration RX 6636.  The six cylinder Hornet in all its guises was by far and away Wolseley’s most successful model in the decade running up to the the war and 6000 of these early (CF3) examples were sold in the 18 months they were available. This car may have been owned by the proprieter of Kent & Sons, the furniture and ironmongery store, which was also a place for motorists to fill-up with petroleum spirit.

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IOTW no.489

By IOTW

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Booked!

This photo will be familiar to many as it often appears in Google searches for pre-war car images. The car featured is a 1930 Gloucestershire registered MG Midget (DG 4**) and the caption states that the photo was taken “…on the corner of Wardour Street’. If that was the case, was it taken at the Oxford Street or Shaftesbury Avenue junctions? The shot doesn’t look to be posed if the expression of gloom on the face of the passenger is anything to go by or that of weary acceptance by the driver. What was the misdemeanor? Speeding? Very unlikely in view of the traffic and proximity of the junction. Parking? perhaps, although would the officer have waited until the occupants returned to the car? As for the vehicle itself, it looks a little care-worn and has been fitted with non-standard side lights, perhaps pointers indicating that the photo was taken in the middle period of that eventful decade.

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I(s)OTW no.488

By IOTW

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JH 5601 1933 Morris Minor Saloon

These very recently acquired snapshot photos of a Hertfordshire registered 1933 Minor Saloon could have been taken either before, or in the ten years immediately after the end of the Second World War. ( Are there any mid-twentieth century fashion experts out there to help pinpoint the date?) The two individuals photographed may well be husband and wife or indeed Mother and son, although the walking stick she is holding rather indicates the latter. The car looks to be in good condition but the registration doesn’t appear on either register and is not recorded by the DVLA or the Harry Edward’s Minor listing, which may weigh the scales in favour of the photos being taken in the pre-war period.

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I(s)OTW no. 487

By IOTW

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KR 5670 1930 Minor Fabric Saloon

Thanks to Mike Tebbett for providing this interesting late Fifties or very early Sixties image. It shows what purports to be a 1930 Kent registered Minor Fabric Saloon fitted with a Wolseley Hornet two-tone fabric body. This was a car that in the late Sixties was owned by Olive Willats and driven to Italy and back in a VSCC event. KR 5670 then made a brief re-appearance almost 40 years later on the back of a trailer at the 2005 VMR Rally at Prescott (see 2nd image) where it was offered for sale. It was eventually purchased by Ian Grace in Seattle, USA in 2010 when it appeared on the Vintage Petrol Pump Company’s website. The car was shipped to the USA where it’s reported that a Maltby of Folkstone coachbuilder’s plate was discovered on the door threshold. This photo pre-dates its known history when not only was it the family transport, it was also at a time when petrol pump attendants would check their customer’s tyre pressures!

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IOTW no.486

By IOTW

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Another mystery Minor

Minor images continue to surface on eBay. This 35mm Kodachrome slide is one such recent example and depicts an unknown 1931 season Morris Minor Coachbuilt Saloon parked outside of an outboard motor service facility somewhere in the UK. The photo was processed in September 1971 according to the information printed onto the cardboard slide mount, it’s therefore likely that this Minor survives to this day. If anyone can identify the car from any visual clues to be seen, then please contact info@prewarminor.com

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IOTW no.485

By IOTW

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Another postcard Minor

Minors are well represented in thirties postcard street scenes. It is however quite unusual for such a card to feature a Minor 5 cwt van, as in this case. This 1934 example, CRF 833, (a local Staffordhire registration) is parked outside of the Barton-under-Needwood cottage hospital where it looks like a nun (or an apparition) is paying a visit.

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I(s)OTW no.484

By IOTW

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Eyston’s Thunderbolt

Thunderbolt was built in the former Bean Car plant in Tipton, Staffs during 1937 in order to attempt to wrest the World Land Speed Record of 301 mph away from Sir Malcolm Campbell and his Bluebird car. The contender was powered by two V12 Rolls Royce R aero engines each of 36.5 litres both of which could develop 2350 bhp. Capt. George Eyston took Thunderbolt to the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah, USA where on the 19th November 1937 he took the record from Campbell by a margin of 11 mph. This achievement sparked a rivalry between Eyston and John Cobb and his Railton Special car who between them broke the LSR on a further five occasions before the outbreak of WWII. The photograph of Thunderbolt was taken in Beans Industries plant at Tipton while Max Millar‘s superb cut-away drawing appears here courtesy of Motorsport Images. (Drag the arrow in either direction to fully reveal each image)

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IOTW no.483

By IOTW

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Brooklands in Surrey was the cradle of both British motorsport and aviation. While an aircraft in a car showroom would be regarded as something of a surprise elsewhere in the U.K., in Weybridge that probably wasn’t the case. This May 1930 image was taken at a promotional event run by Weybridge Automobiles Ltd. and shows a De Havilland DH60G Gypsy Moth (G-AAWR) nestling alongside a number of family saloons including a Morris Minor, its nose visible bottom right. (LAT photoscan from The Autocar 9th May 1930 P.895 – Photo courtesy Motorsport Images)

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IOTW no.482

By IOTW

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Kiwi roadster

Yet another interesting Minor image from one of our New Zealand member’s and frequent contributor, John McDonald. This one depicts a 1932 Two-seater roadster, into which are squeezed three females. It’s not easy to fathom the reason for the obvious revelry but the bunting on the car and the canine mascot on the bonnet should provide clues, only they don’t! Suggestions on a postcard please.

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IOTW no.481

By IOTW

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1937 Morris Eight Ashley Cleave Special

This sporting special has featured both here and on the forum previously and while not a Minor it was perhaps inspired by the two Skinner specials, both of which were competing at the time of its construction. It was built in 1937 from the remains of a crashed Morris Eight Saloon and featured a Minor four-speed gearbox while its Eight engine was supercharged using a Centric blower. It was constructed and driven by W. A. (Ashley) Cleave who won many awards in the car at pre-war hillclimb venues such as Shelsley Walsh and Prescott before being stored for the duration. After the war Cleave rebuilt his car as seen above (Prescott May 1964) with a larger 1250 cc blown Morris engine which reputedly enabled the vehicle to cover the standing quarter mile in 15.2 seconds and could reach 115 mph. Cleave continued to compete into his seventies with the MAC recording the driver and car taking part at a Shelsley meeting in 1972. The car now has a new home and is currently under restoration. (Photo – PWMN collection Bibliographical info. – Tom Bourne Morris Register Historian.)

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IOTW no.480

By IOTW

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Image of the Week photos have been appearing here for over nine years and an archive of earlier photos featured can be found in the Member’s Area of the old website (Adobe Flash required to view). Many of these early shots were scanned directly from thirties postcards and displayed Minors as they were used at that time. This mid-thirties seaside vista is illustrative of that early IOTW period with an OHC Minor Coachbuilt Saloon at rest while its occupants enjoy the delights of Clacton-on-sea, along with what looks like the rest of the population of East Anglia.

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IOTW no.479

By IOTW

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Soap boxes at Brooklands!?

This interesting but undated image is captioned as being taken at Brooklands, although not at part of the circuit recognised by this website’s editor. Almost certainly taken during the thirties, could this be Donington Park?

Footnote: Thanks to Joe Raynor, the location has been identified as London’s Crystal Palace circuit which opened to motor racing in 1937.

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I(s)OTW no.478

By IOTW

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EE 8456

This Grimsby registered 1929 Minor Fabric Saloon is some 140 miles from its original Lincolnshire base and is seen here at Cradle End, Bury Green near Bishops Stortford, Herts in the depths of a harsh cold spell in January 1935. While many cars at that time were ‘laid-up’ over the winter months this Minor was required to remain in service despite the conditions. (Image sourced from the internet)

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IOTW no.477

By IOTW

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OJ 308 1932 Minor Saloon

Thankfully for IOTW, the family car was the focal point for so many thirties family snapshops, this one of Minor Saloon OJ 308 being no exception. The car was first registered in Birmingham and the background to this photo suggests a suburb of that city as the venue. The photographer, presumably the husband/father, has beautifully captured his son’s reflected image on the windscreen.

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IOTW no.476

By IOTW

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Oakham, Rutland

For those who attended the 2017 Rutland Rally this scene may be familiar. It shows the Old Buttercross in Oakham which is located adjacent to the local museum, a venue visited by a number of rallyists during the course of the weekend. This heavily retouched Autocar photoscan has a 1931 Rutland registered £100 car in shot. (FP 2439). The photo first appeared in the 15th July 1932 edition of the Autocar. (LAT Photoscan courtesy of Motorsport Images)

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IOTW no.475

By IOTW

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GPO hybrid Minor vans

This July 1970 image was taken at a Post Office Telephones open day held in Yeading, Middlesex. On display are two hybrid Morris Minor vans; on the left a Royal Mail delivery van, while on the right is a Post Office Telephones Linesman’s van. According to the image caption these particular cars were in use from 1939 and 1937 respectively. (Thanks goes to Ian Judd for spotting these on eBay)

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IOTW no.474

By IOTW

An unusual special

Peter Morrey from Aberdeenshire sent these two images of a very unusual Minor special which was his parent’s first car. The photos seen here were taken in Bilston, Staffs on his Dad’s box Brownie camera, circa 1935 or 36. They show JW 17(?)49,  a mid-1931 Wolverhampton registered Minor sporting a pointed-tail body and tail fin, perhaps in homage to Eyston’s Thunderbolt or Segrave’s Golden Arrow? The front of the car is less unusual, while the wings, louvered side-valances and cut-away door provide a more professional sporting appearance than the rather homemade look of the tail section. The full width screen is also set much lower than was usual at that time. It’s possible that the body started out as a conventional coachbuilt special before being modified later in life. If that was the case, are there any clues present that point to an established coachbuilding concern? (Photo courtesy Peter Morrey)

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IOTW no.473

By IOTW

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Bluebird

Here is a further image of Sir Malcolm Campbell‘s world land speed record breaking Bluebird taken at Brooklands over the Easter holiday period, 25th-28th March  1932 where it was gently exercised in front of a large bank holiday crowd. (LATplate Motor 737-2 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

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IOTW no.472

By IOTW

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The figurine trophies presented to the winners of the national trials and rallies throughout the twenties and thirties are today highly sought-after and valuable. These art deco artefacts were presented by event sponsors, in this case The Autocar magazine. It was won by J.S. Couldrey, who finished first overall in the 1932 Royal Scottish Automobile Club Rally which took place between 4th and 9th July that year. This image first appeared in the 24th June 1932 edition of The Autocar on page 1069. (LAT photoscan courtesy of Motorsport Images)

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IOTW no.471

By IOTW

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Cinema advertising

This advertisement for Belcher’s Garage in Station Road, Southwold appears here by courtesy of the Southwold Museum and an offshoot website, Southwold & Son. The advertisement is in the form of a coloured slide which was was used in the local cinema during intermissions, perhaps the thirties equivalent of the post war Pearl & Dean ads. The car in question is a 1931 season Coachbuilt Saloon, available only in maroon and priced at £140.

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IOTW no.470

By IOTW

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Brancaster Staithe –  May 2010

The late lamented Brian Maeers was an inspiration to many who crossed his path in the pre-war Minor world. His enthusiasm for all things Morris Minor was infectious and this photo typifies that passion. The occasion was a small gathering of Minor owners centred on Brian’s home at Holme-next-the-sea on the North Norfolk coast, over a wet and windy early May weekend in 2010. The poor weather wasn’t sufficiently bad to persuade Brian to alter his planned mini-tour route, which included this stop on a very windswept Brancaster Staithe. It was here that photographer Paul Keates captured this dramatic image of Brian’s 1932 Tourer OY 3270, Trevor Wilkinson’s 1934 Two-seater UN 6979 and the editorial Semi-Sports VJ 3156. Gone but not forgotten!

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IOTW no.469

By IOTW

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Malcolm Campbell & Bluebird

For a generation of British ‘Baby boomer’ children, those who grew-up in the fifties and sixties, the name Campbell was synonymous with speed and record breaking. It was much the same for an earlier generation, those raised in the two inter-world war decades. The Campbells in question were father Malcolm, and his son, Donald, who over a 44 year period held 21 separate land and water speed records between them. All of the record breaking vehicles carried the name ‘Bluebird‘ as did Malcolm Campbell’s early racing cars. Here, a youngish Malcolm Campbell is pictured at Brooklands alongside such a car. Unfortunately, the image is uncaptioned, although the word ‘Bluebird’ is discernable on the bonnet top, along with the figure five, the car’s racing number. The photo is likely to have been taken in the immediate aftermath of WWI and prior to 1924, which was the year he broke the land speed record for the first time. (The author would appreciate any help in identifying the car and dating the photograph.) Photo courtesy Motor Sport Images (LATplate Black 3961A)

Edited to add: Joe Rayner has identified the car as a 1912 Lorraine Deitrich, ‘Vieux Charles III’ which can currently be seen on long-term loan at the Brooklands Museum. This extract from the museum’s website provides some background to the photograph. “In the ownership of Malcolm Campbell, after the First World War it was brought to Brooklands as one of his famous Blue Bird racing cars and won the first race when the track re-opened in 1920. Apart from a short visit to Hampshire, the car has been based at, or near, Brooklands ever since.”

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IOTW no.468

By IOTW

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Contrasts

A timely reminder of  2018’s  ‘beast from the east’, this twenties ‘bleak mid-winter’ shot of an Austin Seven chummy is in stark contrast to the balmy or barmy (both apply!) February weather currently being experienced in much of the U.K. It is certainly fair to say that the majority of cars built in the fifteen year period prior to the commencement of WWII could cope far better in conditions such as that seen in this photograph, than many of the front-wheel-drive vehicles built today.

(Photo Courtesy of Motorsport Images LATplate Red 3929)

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IOTW no.467

By IOTW

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JN 723

The two images to be seen here of a 1930 Southend-on-Sea registered Minor Coachbuilt Saloon were discovered quite seperately on eBay some three years apart. They have languished in the archive until a recent search for images of other ‘JN’ registered vehicles paired them together. There is little of merit in either photograph other than that they represent typical snapshots of the pre-war period. The unidentified motorcycle GY 8179 was first registered in London in 1932, while the top image is captioned ‘Riverside House – May 1939’.

Joe Rayner has subsequently identified the motorcycle as a Coventry Eagle ‘Silent Superb’. Thanks Joe.

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IOTW no.466

By IOTW

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JO 5644

The 1933 season Morris Family Eight press car/factory demonstrator was first registered in Oxford in the late summer of 1932 as JO 5644. It was this car that was famously photographed beneath the Eiffel Tower sometime over the winter of 1932/33. However, both images seen here were taken in the UK. The first of these was shot just a short distance from the car’s place of manufacture in St Giles, Oxford where it is being directed into a parking space by an unkempt official. The second photo was taken adjacent to a quiet Thames backwater at Teddington, Middlesex and was used by The Autocar journalist Charles Wynne as a ‘header’ for his Touring Topics column. The same photograph also featured in a May 1933 edition of the Light Car magazine.

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IOTW no.465

By IOTW

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DF 9053

This shot of 1930 Morris Minor Coachbuilt saloon DF 9053 and its owner Paul Harris was taken in the late sixties.

Paul writesDF 9053….which I restored in 1968 and covered (I think) in my article you kindly found. First photo is of her with me before I finished off putting windows in etc.”

Forty years later in 2006, former Network member Jeremy Evans refurbished the car and used it for two or three seasons before selling it to a Belfast enthusiast. Today, the car remains in regular use in the north of England.

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IOTW no. 464

By IOTW

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1932 Wolseley Hornet Coupe OV 5829

Introduced at the same time as the lwb Family Eight Sports Coupe the 1932 Hornet version of the same body style very closely resembles that of the following season Morris Minor Special Coupe. This eBay sourced snapshot of a late 1931 Birmingham registered car is one of six negatives of the vehicle (and its owners), all of which look to have been taken in the fifties if the female fashion and general condition of the car are considered. While there are images of surviving Hornet Coupes to be found on the internet, they are few and far between, which would seem to indicate that not too many survive.

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IOTW no.463

By IOTW

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More Minor postcard images

Two more old postcard images featuring Minors. These photos are rarely exciting but they do depict the cars being used for the mainly mundane purposes for which they were originally purchased. The website’s archive now contains over 100 of these postcard shots, which cover the length and the breadth of the land and there are even one or two from outside the British Isles. There are a further two North Hill, Minehead, Somerset postcard images in the archive to compliment the one seen here, while the Ripon, Yorks market square scene is a ‘first’ for this town. Top – 1932 Minor Saloon along with a Standard Litte Nine . Beneath – 1933 Minor Two-seater.

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IOTW no.462

By IOTW

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A motoring gymkhana

A proposal to hold a motoring gymkhana today would no doubt raise a few eyebrows, but they were not uncommon during the thirties decade. Henly’s Motor Group held an annual customer event each summer at Heston Airport while the Eastbourne concours d’élégance weekend also held an associated gymkhana. This photograph was taken in July 1931 at a similar event which on this occasion had been organised by the Bugatti Owners Club. The two (very recently) London registered vehicles involved are an MG Midget (GK 1284), seen here clearly leading a Bugatti (GK 17). The Midget’s driver is about to occupy, or be seated upon the the upturned bucket, although the purpose of the exercise remains a mystery to the writer. However, it does look like they are enjoying themselves!

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IOTW no.461

By IOTW

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Regular contributor and Christchurch, New Zealand resident John McDonald, has sent this image of a care-worn ohc Minor Saloon 379-926, which in view of its paint job was probably taken between 1966 and 1969. John advises that the photo was taken in Dunedin on New Zealand’s South Island while the car’s likely owner was sure to be under 25 years of age! Apart from the red heart emblems painted upon the body, along with similarly coloured painted headlamp shells, the carburettor has also received a coat!

John has sent a correction to this post: “The Minor wears registration plates that were legal between 1956 to 30 June 1961. Secondly, the sticker in the top left of the windscreen is an annual one, to be displayed when the fee is paid. The blue/yellow one shown here was for the period 1/7/1960 to 30/6/1961. So I think the given date of 1960 is correct”.

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IOTW no.460

By IOTW

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This Shetland Museum image depicts a Minor Fabric Saloon PS 775, a 1930 ‘Zetland’ registered car but a model built prior to the change from Smiths to Armstrong shock absorbers. The other visible clue that this is perhaps an early 1930 season car or even a late registration of a 1929 model is the continued presence of the ‘Morris’ script attached to the radiator core. Both of these changes occurring in very early October 1929 after which the radiator core remained naked. The girder-framed motorcycle will be familiar to some who read this but unfortunately not to the writer.

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IOTW no.459

By IOTW

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RC 300 – 1931 registered McEvoy Minor

It was the Jensen bothers concern in West Bromwich, who on instructions from Michael McEvoy,  built the first McEvoy Minor (Model 70) body in the autumn of 1931. The car in question was to receive the Derby registration RC 300 and become something of a celebrity after it carried competition number 1 at the first ever RAC Rally in March 1932. Prior to that, McEvoy had heavily advertised the model in the Motor Sport magazine who in December 1931 had commissioned a photographer to take a sequence of at least seven photographs of the car for use in the forthcoming advertisements. One of these images was never used as the camera moved at the time the shutter was released, resulting in a blurring of the subsequent photo. Here this photograph sees the light of day for the first time, although little will be learned as much of the important detail is lost. Despite that, it remains an integral part of the car’s early history and is published here on that basis. (Photo courtesy of Motor Sport Images)

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IOTW no.458

By IOTW

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Ken the Horse, Hawick

Postcards can be a great source for learning. It was this image of a 1932 Minor that led to a little internet research which uncovered the fascinating story outlined below. The Minor Saloon is about to pass the 1514 Memorial in Hawick, a town located just on the Scot’s side of the Anglo/Scottish border. The following passage has been extracted from the Ken the Horse website: This memorial commemorates the victory of local youths or “callants” from the town over a party of English raiders at Hornshole, just outside Hawick in 1514, most of the men of the town having been killed on Flodden Field the previous year. The English flag was captured and carried back to Hawick, the capture of which is commemorated in this proud statue.

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IOTW no.457

By IOTW

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Water baby?

This photograph first appeared in the August 1936 edition of the Morris Owner magazine on page 561. The image caption reads as follows:

Mr J.H. Marshall, the Ilkley Motor Club’s President, demonstrates that a Minor Two-seater can cross the River Wharfe without bridge or ford. Just beyond where the car is standing is the deepest part of the stream.

It’s interesting to note that the Minor continued to be regularly mentioned in this journal right up to the commencement of WWII, demonstarting perhaps that it was a model the magazine’s editorial staff and its readership held in high esteem.

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IOTW no. 456

By IOTW

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The latter days of an M Type?

It’s likely that this car started life as an MG M Type Midget before it was rebodied at some point, perhaps in the forties or fifties. Certainly, the front of the car bears all the hallmarks of the first MG Midget, despite the rear wheels originating from a Minor. Unfortunately, the reverse of this eBay sourced print provides no clues as to the car’s location but a detective would no doubt start his/her investigation in Douglas, I.O.M. The car is wearing a tax disc and is parked-up at what looks like a regular parking-bay so is almost certainly mobile, unlike many of these seaside photographer’s props of the period. Such a vehicle today would certainly attract the attention of the boys-in-blue, but perhaps not in pre-MOT days?

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IOTW no. 455

By IOTW

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There is almost nothing to commend this photograph in that the subject’s face is obscured by her hand and the car’s identity will forever remain unknown due to the angle of the shot. Despite that, there is still plenty to be gleaned from the image. It was almost certainly taken prior to 1950 as the rooflines are yet to be disturbed by television aerials while the car is undoubtedly a 1932 season Morris Family Eight Sports Coupe, (to give it its full title), note the sidelights and calormeter.  The photograph was taken in Holmthwaite in what is now Cumbria, the sign on the wall providing the clue, confirmed by its listing on eBay from whence it was purchased. Just another small piece of Minor history to add to the archive.

IOTW no.455

By IOTW

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There is almost nothing to commend this photograph in that the subject’s face is obscured by her hand and the car’s identity will forever remain unknown due to the angle of the shot. Despite that, there is still plenty to be gleaned from the image. It was almost certainly taken prior to 1950 as the rooflines are yet to be disturbed by television aerials while the car is undoubtedly a 1932 season Morris Family Eight Sports Coupe, (to give it its full title), note the sidelights and calormeter.  The photograph was taken in Holmthwaite in what is now Cumbria, the sign on the wall providing the clue, confirmed by its listing on eBay from whence it was purchased. Just another small piece of Minor history to add to the archive.

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IOTW no.454

By IOTW

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Changing history

Labelling reportage as ‘fake news’ when it is in fact truthful is not a recent phenomena and neither are attempts to change history, either deliberately or otherwise. If this undated, internet sourced item concerning the £100 Minor is to be believed, then all owners of the 1931 SV Minor Two-seater should expect their car to reach 100mph and achieve fuel consumption figures of 100 miles to the gallon of fuel. Those with an interest in the Minor will know that the figures referred to in the truncated image caption text refer to the specially built model that took part in a publicity stunt in the summer of 1931 and went on to become the Red Minor, piloted by Peter Skinner.

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I(s)OTW no.453

By IOTW

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Designed by Gordon England

It wasn’t until July 1930 that Morris Motors added a two-seater to their Minor range,  a full two years after the model was first launched. They turned to an established coachbuilder for assistance and the Gordon England concern effectively resurrected a design they had first used some 18 months previously on their own ‘England Minor Two-seater’. The similarities are very evident in the photographs to be seen here including the stippled bonnet finish, which on the Morris Semi-Sports was rolled into the bonnet sheet metal, while a matching fabric to that of the body was applied to the bonnet of the England Two-seater. However, the England car was far better appointed in that it was supplied with Moseley ‘Float-on-air’ cushions and an integrated chassis lubrication system among other refinements. The heavily dished steering wheel to be seen on the England Two-seater dates the car to late 1928 or early 1929, making this special one of the earliest to be produced.

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IOTW(s) no.452

By IOTW

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Identity crisis

The three images to be seen here of 1932 Minor Two-seater PL 6371 were taken over a period spanning almost 60 years. The first black & white photo of a young man seated in his freshly refurbished Minor (note new hood and paintwork) was taken in the late sixties. The next image depicts the same man some ten years later seated once again in PL 6371 outside his home with a young child peering through an open window. The third photo was taken in September 2017 and was used to successfully advertise the car for sale on eBay. Unfortunately, it looks as if the new owner has stripped the car of its identity as the registration plate PL 6371 is now affixed to a white Fiat.

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I(s)OTW no.451

By IOTW

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Fothergill Minor Special

Tim Green emailed the Network in an attempt to establish if this 1931 Hertfordshire registered Minor (UR 9276) had survived. The car was owned by his friend Derek Fothergill, a Chippenham, Wilts resident who purchased and rebuilt the car upon leaving the army after WWII. The car was then used to tour Wales as honeymoon transport following his marriage in 1947. The two images seen here of ‘Jane’, as the car was  named, were taken at that time. Sadly, it doesn’t look as if Derek’s Minor has survived, as it’s not listed by the DVLA, either of the main registers and is also not recorded among the Minor survivors in the Harry Edwards archive.

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IOTW no.450

By IOTW

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1932 MCC London-Edinburgh Trial

Lt. Cdr. G.M.D. Maltby R.N. was a keen motoring trialist as well as being a retired naval officer. He was also associated with the Kent coachbuilding company that bore his family name until that business was sold in 1927. Here he is seen in a 1929 Somerset registered MG Midget (YC 7221) climbing Park Rash during the course of the 1932 running of the MCC London-Edinburgh trial. Unfortunately, Cowbourne records that he wasn’t among the awards that weekend. There are further photos of Maltby in another Midget (MG 703 – This car is currently in the custodianship of member, Ian Judd)) taken at the RSAC Rally in 1936. (Motor Sport negative – courtesy of LAT Images)

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IOTW no.449

By IOTW

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Cowley – but when?

Morris Films made many documentary ‘shorts’ throughout the late twenties and thirties and this still image was snipped from one of them. The film was shot at Cowley in late 1928 or 1929 and shows Minors passing along the production line. Dating the image more precisely is not easy, as although the cars have the later steering wheel (post early October 1928) they are still being fitted with nickel radiators, single stay radiator supports and Morris script all of which were replaced or updated early into the 1930 production season, circa October 1929. The image does however provide absolute clarity concerning the precise positioning of the manufacturer’s data plate and coil on the bulkhead.

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IOTW no. 448

By IOTW

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1932 Brighton Speed Trials

The Brighton Speed Trials is an event that dates back to 1905 and takes place on Madeira Drive adjacent to the sea. It’s generally an annual event although there have been a number of notable breaks.  One such hiatus was between 1925 and 1932 following a change in the law prohibiting motor sport on public roads. Its return after a seven year gap was made possible when it was realised that Maderia Drive was owned by the town corporation and not the Ministry of Transport, therefore it was not deemed a public highway.  The 1932 event attracted a crowd of over 100,000, no doubt enticed by the prospect of a duel between John Cobb and Malcolm Campbell.  This short Pathe film of the event shows the two world land speed record holders going head to head along that famous seafront. This photograph, taken at that 1932 event,  shows a 1932 Kent registered Swallow Wolseley Hornet special (KJ 1461) competing against a Frazer-Nash, the duel’s outcome not being known. (The Pathe film cameraman can be seen in the background.) For more information about the speed trials visit this website. (LAT Autocar photoscan)

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IOTW no.447

By IOTW

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A spring 1931 Birmingham registered EW Hornet Sports (OV 1173) features in this Autocar column heading artwork. The fountain at Hascombe, Surrey still exists while sadly, this lovely early example of a Hornet special, doesn’t. The original image appeared in the 30th June 1933 edition of The Autocar. (Photoscan image by courtesy of LAT)

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IOTW NO.446

By IOTW

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1932 GPO ‘Linesman’ Minor 5cwt van
Of the 87,000 Morris Minors produced between the autumn of 1928 and the summer of 1934, 58,000 of them were saloons of various types.  Numerically, and some way behind the saloon, the 5cwt van took the runners up spot with just under 10,000 examples leaving Cowley. This was due in part to a succession of orders from the GPO, who extensively used the Minor van for Royal Mail delivery as well as in a variety of other roles. This photo of a 1932 model depicts a GPO Linesman’s van, GW 2426 which was among the first batch of six such experimental vehicles to be supplied to the organisation. The bodies were built by Harold Perry Ltd., who also successfully bodied a number of Ford Eight specials around the same period, their business eventually gaining Ford main dealership status. Grateful thanks goes to forumist Joe Raynor (oilyrag) for the use of the photograph and for the background information.

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IOTW no.445

By IOTW

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PL 2347 again!

This post September 1930, Surrey registered Wolseley Hornet Saloon PL 2347 was used by the Chief Photographer of the Iliffe publishing group, Mr. Donald Osmond, throughout the early thirties and into the second half of that decade. It appears in many feature articles in the Autocar magazine and constantly crops up in the background of many other photographs held in the LAT Photographic Archive. This photo has a caption scratched into the plate’s emulsion that simply reads Haweswater. The Network’s archive holds over 50 different images of this car taken between 1931 and 1937.

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IOTW no.444

By IOTW

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1925-26 Nomad

Marketed as a ‘real car’ by makers Gnome of Chelsea the Nomad sold for £99-9s-9d long before the introduction of the 1931 SV Morris Minor. According to Nick Baldwin’s book, ‘A-Z of Cars of the Twenties’, the firm sold at least 25 examples from their New Kings Road, SW6 premises. The rear-mounted  343 cc Villiers single cylinder two-stroke engine produced 8.25 bhp and powered the car to 40 mph while consuming a gallon of petrol/oil mixture every 50 miles. No suspension was fitted, the pneumatic tyres providing the necessary cushion effect, being inflated to just 6 psi according to Baldwin. (LATplate Red 2768)

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IOTW no.443

By IOTW

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1934 WASA Trial

London registered 1933 Minor Two-seater JJ 9444 has featured in this spot on a previous occasion (IOTW no.200). That image was also taken during the course of the March 1934 running of the WASA Chiltern Trial. Here, the Minor crewed by two unnamed women, is about to begin a descent into a sunken green lane somewhere in the Chiltern Hills, watched by a small but interested band of spectators. (LATplate C2551)

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IOTW no.442

By IOTW

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German Minor

Another eBay Minor find, on this occasion by Tom Bourne, the Morris Register historian. Tom spotted the image on the German eBay site and as a result the snapshot was purchased for the Network’s archive. There are no caption details on the reverse of the print and the only clue appears on the vehicle’s registration plate. The letters ‘HZ’ inform that the car was registered in Herzberg, a town in the Gottingen district in Lower Saxony.  The 1933 Minor Two-seater HZ 52259 is carrying a strange ‘Morris’ script on its radiator while the period looks to be the forties or fifties. Was the car exported to Germany in the pre-war period or was it perhaps the former mount of an occupying British seviceman?

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IOTW no.441

By IOTW

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WL 6556 1929 MG Midget

The 28th June 1929 edition of The Autocar carried a two-page road test (no.61) on an Oxford built MG MidgetWL 6556. This LAT scan features one of four photos  appearing in that article and displays the model’s interior with the dash panel, leather Moseley float-on-air seat squab, carpeting and rectangular door pocket clearly on view. The later Abingdon produced cars had front hinged doors with a brake cross-shaft hidden from view, while the centrally mounted horn button was also moved to a new position under the dash.

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IOTW no.440

By IOTW

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Autumn 1934

This photograph is one of a sequence in which a number of different models are being photographed outside the premises of a car dealership, presumably in order to advertise the cars ‘For Sale’. As can be seen from the window display the dealer is has announced the arrival of the 1935 range of Morris cars, which of course included the Minor’s successor, the new Morris Eight. The 1934 season Minor two-door sliding head Saloon would now be considered ‘old hat’ and this particular example has covered plenty of miles if the condition of the spare tyre is an indicator. The 1934 season Minors were extremely good value for money when new with leather upholstery, a four-speed synchromesh gearbox, along with hydraulic brakes and shock absorbers, which may partly account for their comparatively high survival rate. (LATplate E9842)

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IOTW no.439

By IOTW

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MG Car Club Abingdon Trial 1939

When this photograph was taken in 1939, Minor Two-seater YY 7277 was already six years old, the model having been out of production since July 1934. W. C. Greenleaf was a regular competitor in the car,  a number of photographs appearing in both the Light Car and Morris Owner magazines. This shot shows the car needing a helping hand as it struggles to find grip on a muddy Chiltern incline during the course of the MG Car Club’s annual Abingdon Trial in the run-up to the start of WWII. The photograph was taken by noted motoring photographer Bill Brunell.

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IOTW no.438

By IOTW

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Yet another eBay snapshot this time of a Stewart & Ardern registered 1932 Minor two-door Saloon (MU 3932) The apparel worn by the driver is clearly a clue as to his profession and is similar to that worn by those employed by railway or bus companies or that of a chauffeur. The Minor is clearly his pride and joy! A lot more about Stewart & Ardern here.

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IOTW no.437

By IOTW

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Brooklands – Mid-twenties

The Jappic was a 350 cc ‘V’ twin JAP powered cyclecar which held many speed records between 1924 and 1931.  Apart from being quick, the car was also extremely lightweight and could be manhandled  easily as seen in this YouTube video. There is also much more about the car elsewhere on the internet. (LATplate Red 1085)

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IOTW no.436

By IOTW

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MW 4892 1929 Minor Fabric Saloon

First registered in Wiltshire in mid-1929 this Fabric saloon looks to be in good general condition, although the almost bald nearside front tyre might appear to indicate otherwise. A manual trumpet horn has been fitted to the windscreen surround, something that was not unusual and indicative of the temperamentality of the Lucas Sparton Horn, the car’s standard warning device. For what usage or purpose was the Ingersoll-Rand branded item of industrial equipment, as seen in the background? (Thanks goes to Mike Tebbett for permitting the publication of this image, which was from a French source.)

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IOTW no.435

By IOTW

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1929 MCC London-Exeter Trial

There were 194 car entrants for the 1929 running of the MCC’s London/Exeter trial. The event was held over two days (27th & 28th December 1929) with participants leaving the Slough Trading Estate in the late evening of the 27th, with a run through the night to Exeter where breakfast was taken. This photo was almost certainly taken at that breakfasting point in Exeter shortly after sunrise although the image has not been captioned by the photographer. While no Minors or Midgets can be seen in this photo, two Minors and ten Midgets did take part, those numbers increasing to five and twenty eight respectively for the 1930 event. (LATplate B3013)

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IOTW no.434

By IOTW

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Appearing on he front cover of 18th December 1928 edition of the Motor magazine was an  MG Car Co. advertisement. (of which this is an extract) Alongside the new 18/80 six cylinder model was a depiction of the MG Midget, launched just two months earlier at the 1928 London Motor Show. What is interesting about this artwork is that the Midget body had still to undergo changes before the first production examples appeared just over a month later. This artist’s impression shows the car with a raised scuttle and sculptured doors ala the prototypes that appeared at the Motor Show, while the production bodies did not have either of these features. Also of interest is the Limerick CBC registration – TI 1271. Did the artist have a premonition concerning  the capacity of the engine that was to power the Wolseley Hornet some 16 months later? Doubtful, but an interesting co-incidence none-the-less.

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IOTW no.433

By IOTW

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Morris model

Following his elavation to the peerage, Lord Nuffield was presented with this silver model of a Morris 10-4  by the principals of his dealership chain as a token of their esteem on 22nd October 1934. (LAT photo scan)

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IOTW no.432

By IOTW

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PS 782

This Minor Fabric Saloon was one of nine such Zetland registered cars in the year 1929. Remarkably,  Morris Minors represented almost 14% of all new vehicle registrations that year which of course includes motor cycles, goods and public service vehicles. This Fabric Saloon PS 782 was first registered on 1st May to a Mr Robert Henry  and retained this registration until 1946. Thanks to forum member ‘Crashbox’ for the research and the Sheland Photographic Archive. (Photo reference NE 04262)

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IOTW no.431

By IOTW

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Henley’s Gymkhana

Throughout the early thirties the Henly’s dealership held an annual motoring gymkhana on Heston Aerodrome, located just to the west of London. The event was popular with their customers who attended in some numbers to watch the many events. One such arena game was ‘car musical chairs’ as portrayed in this LAT image (LATplate C911) taken at the 1933 event. The women driver of the 1932 Minor Family Eight is either slow vacating her chair or quick to be seated depending upon whether the music had stopped or just started again!

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IOTW no.430

By IOTW

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JG 785

Very little by way of additional information can be added to this simple family snapshot. The car is a 1930 Minor Saloon registered in Canterbury, Kent as JG 785 and like so many of the photographs of the period it depicts the family partaking in a roadside picnic. It is quite possible that the car is the fabric skinned version of the model and that the photo was taken some time later that decade if the almost bald tyres are anything to go by.

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IOTW no.429

By IOTW

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Cowley – late 1933

This recently discovered image of a Minor chassis passing along the production line at Cowley was probably photographed in the autumn of 1933. The plate’s emulsion  has been marked, recording that the car is a 1934 Morris Minor while the radiator surround is identical to those fitted to the 1933 season model along with those from the early part of the 1934 season. It’s interesting to see that a document wallet is attatched to the n/s bulkhead to rad support bar, presumably held in which are the dockets that accompany the car down the line. (LATplate Motor X-899)

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IOTW no.428

By IOTW

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Minor art

This extract from a full-page Morris Motors advertisement for the Minor first appeared on the front cover of 12th April 1932 edition of The Motor magazine. This was not unusual in that the Minor featured on magazine covers on almost fifty occasions while in production.  Many of the famous graphic artists of the period painted and drew the Minor including the likes of Morton, Steerwood, Shuffley and the acclaimed Harold Connolly. These cover images are all available to view in the Member’s Area of the archived site.

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IOTW no.427

By IOTW

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Wartime McEvoy

TJ 1876 is a 1933 McEvoy Model 60 Minor Special owned at one time by the late Bev Hicks, who was a founder member of what is now the Morris Register. This photograph was taken during WWII when the car was in the custodianship of an RAF Observer.  A known survivor, the car was last seen ‘For Sale’ in Belgium in 2015. (Image courtesy of the Harry Edwards archive)

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IOTW no.426

By IOTW

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Here is an official Morris Motors shot of their 1933 Minor rolling chassis. This is not the image used in the 1933 Operation Manual but the four-speed gearbox, cable brakes and handbrake lever easily identify it as such. This particular viewing angle shows off the conical shape of the Minor’s silencer to good effect. (The mark on the n/s front wheel is damage to the emulsion on the glass plate negative.) LATplate E2760

 ( Edited on 21st April: James Ashford correctly points out that this is a long wheelbase Minor chassis.)

Sponsored by LAT Photographic Archive www.latphoto.co.uk

I(s)OTW no.425

By IOTW

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UD 2268

This sequence of four images of UD 2268, a development model Minor Fabric Saloon, were shot at Cowley in a section of the factory that was used for this purpose for many years. These early development Fabric Saloons differed from the production versions that followed in many detailed ways and first started to appear in the late spring of 1928, four such cars appearing in the promotional material of the time. Some years ago an internet debate took place in which it was speculated that these images were all of the same car, simply fitted with differing number plates. (LATplates L3935, 3936, 3941 & 3942)