IOTW no.483

By IOTW

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Brooklands in Surrey was the cradle of both British motorsport and aviation. While an aircraft in a car showroom would be regarded as something of a surprise elsewhere in the U.K., in Weybridge that probably wasn’t the case. This May 1930 image was taken at a promotional event run by Weybridge Automobiles Ltd. and shows a De Havilland DH60G Gypsy Moth (G-AAWR) nestling alongside a number of family saloons including a Morris Minor, its nose visible bottom right. (LAT photoscan from The Autocar 9th May 1930 P.895 – Photo courtesy Motorsport Images)

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IOTW no.482

By IOTW

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Kiwi roadster

Yet another interesting Minor image from one of our New Zealand member’s and frequent contributor, John McDonald. This one depicts a 1932 Two-seater roadster, into which are squeezed three females. It’s not easy to fathom the reason for the obvious revelry but the bunting on the car and the canine mascot on the bonnet should provide clues, only they don’t! Suggestions on a postcard please.

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IOTW no.481

By IOTW

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1937 Morris Eight Ashley Cleave Special

This sporting special has featured both here and on the forum previously and while not a Minor it was perhaps inspired by the two Skinner specials, both of which were competing at the time of its construction. It was built in 1937 from the remains of a crashed Morris Eight Saloon and featured a Minor four-speed gearbox while its Eight engine was supercharged using a Centric blower. It was constructed and driven by W. A. (Ashley) Cleave who won many awards in the car at pre-war hillclimb venues such as Shelsley Walsh and Prescott before being stored for the duration. After the war Cleave rebuilt his car as seen above (Prescott May 1964) with a larger 1250 cc blown Morris engine which reputedly enabled the vehicle to cover the standing quarter mile in 15.2 seconds and could reach 115 mph. Cleave continued to compete into his seventies with the MAC recording the driver and car taking part at a Shelsley meeting in 1972. The car now has a new home and is currently under restoration. (Photo – PWMN collection Bibliographical info. – Tom Bourne Morris Register Historian.)

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IOTW no.480

By IOTW

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Image of the Week photos have been appearing here for over nine years and an archive of earlier photos featured can be found in the Member’s Area of the old website (Adobe Flash required to view). Many of these early shots were scanned directly from thirties postcards and displayed Minors as they were used at that time. This mid-thirties seaside vista is illustrative of that early IOTW period with an OHC Minor Coachbuilt Saloon at rest while its occupants enjoy the delights of Clacton-on-sea, along with what looks like the rest of the population of East Anglia.

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IOTW no.479

By IOTW

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Soap boxes at Brooklands!?

This interesting but undated image is captioned as being taken at Brooklands, although not at part of the circuit recognised by this website’s editor. Almost certainly taken during the thirties, could this be Donington Park?

Footnote: Thanks to Joe Raynor, the location has been identified as London’s Crystal Palace circuit which opened to motor racing in 1937.

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I(s)OTW no.478

By IOTW

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EE 8456

This Grimsby registered 1929 Minor Fabric Saloon is some 140 miles from its original Lincolnshire base and is seen here at Cradle End, Bury Green near Bishops Stortford, Herts in the depths of a harsh cold spell in January 1935. While many cars at that time were ‘laid-up’ over the winter months this Minor was required to remain in service despite the conditions. (Image sourced from the internet)

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IOTW no.477

By IOTW

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OJ 308 1932 Minor Saloon

Thankfully for IOTW, the family car was the focal point for so many thirties family snapshops, this one of Minor Saloon OJ 308 being no exception. The car was first registered in Birmingham and the background to this photo suggests a suburb of that city as the venue. The photographer, presumably the husband/father, has beautifully captured his son’s reflected image on the windscreen.

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IOTW no.476

By IOTW

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Oakham, Rutland

For those who attended the 2017 Rutland Rally this scene may be familiar. It shows the Old Buttercross in Oakham which is located adjacent to the local museum, a venue visited by a number of rallyists during the course of the weekend. This heavily retouched Autocar photoscan has a 1931 Rutland registered £100 car in shot. (FP 2439). The photo first appeared in the 15th July 1932 edition of the Autocar. (LAT Photoscan courtesy of Motorsport Images)

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IOTW no.475

By IOTW

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GPO hybrid Minor vans

This July 1970 image was taken at a Post Office Telephones open day held in Yeading, Middlesex. On display are two hybrid Morris Minor vans; on the left a Royal Mail delivery van, while on the right is a Post Office Telephones Linesman’s van. According to the image caption these particular cars were in use from 1939 and 1937 respectively. (Thanks goes to Ian Judd for spotting these on eBay)

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IOTW no.474

By IOTW

An unusual special

Peter Morrey from Aberdeenshire sent these two images of a very unusual Minor special which was his parent’s first car. The photos seen here were taken in Bilston, Staffs on his Dad’s box Brownie camera, circa 1935 or 36. They show JW 17(?)49,  a mid-1931 Wolverhampton registered Minor sporting a pointed-tail body and tail fin, perhaps in homage to Eyston’s Thunderbolt or Segrave’s Golden Arrow? The front of the car is less unusual, while the wings, louvered side-valances and cut-away door provide a more professional sporting appearance than the rather homemade look of the tail section. The full width screen is also set much lower than was usual at that time. It’s possible that the body started out as a conventional coachbuilt special before being modified later in life. If that was the case, are there any clues present that point to an established coachbuilding concern? (Photo courtesy Peter Morrey)

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