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Triple M corner no.227

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Date: 4th July 1936 Venue: Donington Park Occasion: BRDC Nuffield Trophy Meeting. Standing alongside the Bellevue Garage entered MG ‘R’ Type (no.2) are Doreen Evans, Goldie Gardner (right), Kenneth Evans and (presumably), the partly obscured Denis Evans. Just 19 days later Doreen was married to American Allan Phipps. To discover much more about Doreen Evans, read Geoff Broadhead’s fascinating article in the just released 2020 edition of the Triple M Yearbook, whch can be ordered via this link. (LATplate C9400 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.226

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

KJ 6175 (2/M 3178) is a 1932 Kent registered metal panelled MG Midget. It was acquired by Richard Hyde in the late 1960’s as this photo portrays. As with so many things, life got in the way of the car’s restoration until earlier this year when Richard decided to part with it. It has now been purchased by forum member ‘Essexboyjim’ and its long awaited journey back to roadworthiness has begun at last.

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.54

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This photo was taken on Saturday 7th February 1931 at the SUNBAC Colmore Trial. PL 2698 is a 1930 Surrey registered Hoyal Hornet Special driven by C.H. Livesey. He was an accomplished performer and took part in many trials during the early thirties driving predominantly Hornets and Minors. A particularly well known photo of Livesey shows him at the wheel of a 1930 Hoyal Minor Two-seater being hauled up an incline in Bluehills Mine while taking part in the 1930 MCC Land’s End event. Here he appears to be in trouble once again as Bridgman-Metchim in an Austin Seven catches up with him while ascending one of the hills that afternoon. Despite this Livesey won a 1st class award at this event. Later that same year he took PL 2698 to a clubmans meeting at Brooklands and achieved fastest time of the day for an ascent of the famous test hill. (LATplate B5429 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.53

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Here is the prototype Wolseley Hornet McEvoy Special (CH 9869) with its creator at the wheel. Michael McEvoy entered his car for the 21st running of the MCC London-Gloucester Trial which was held on Saturday 12th December 1931. It was a successful outing for both car and driver as they picked up a top Silver Cup award, one of only 8 (of 86) entrants to do so.  (LATplate B7405 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.225

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This photograph was taken during the 1936 running of the MCC London-Lands End Trial. The car in shot is K.W. Mahoney‘s 1933 J Type MG Midget (HH 6753) seen here ascending one of the eight observed hills en route. Mahoney was to compete in the ‘Lands End’ on four occasions in the run-up to the Second World War, although this was his only outing in an MG. He was to gain a Premier Award for his drive in 1936. (LATplate C8315 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.224

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

MG Midget GF 6779 was first registered in London in the early spring of 1930. There is little of note to differentiate this car from the many other M Type Midgets that appeared on the roads that year apart from the electric windscreen wiper and an MG Car Club octagonal badge of a design not seen previously by the writer. (The MG Car Club was founded on 12th October 1930 at The Roebuck Hotel in Stevenage, Hertfordshire.) Was the badge an early club issue, or was it perhaps just the brainchild of GF 6779’s owner?

Triple M corner no.223

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

These two artistic impressions of the MG Midget were created by James Dugdale in 1980. They show both the standard Midget (top) and Randall’s racing Brooklands Double Twelve version beneath. They first appeared on the reverse of  poster which also artistically depicted an MG M Type Midget competing in a trial.

Triple M corner no.222

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

RX 5974, a 1931 season MG 8/33 Midget Sportsman’s Coupe was the subject of a publicity photoshoot of which at least four images survive. This internet sourced shot shows the car in a summer setting adjacent to an idyllic English cottage, which was also the location for another of the surviving photographs taken that day.

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.52

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Eustace Watkins were the London main dealers for Wolseley cars and were quick to spot the sporting potential in the Wolseley Hornet six cylinder engine. Although not the first to market an open sports body on the Hornet chassis they were not too far behind the Surrey coachbuilder, Hoyal. This model first appeared in the autumn of 1930 and was priced at £225.

Triple M corner no.221

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This Light Car & Cyclecar cover shows an MG Midget on Hustyn Hill possibly taking part in the 1931 MCC London-Lands End Trial. As can be seen in the magazine’s trhc, this edition is from March 25th 1932 and the cover is serving to advertise the 1932 event which was to take place on 3rd/4th April that year. If, as is probable the photo was taken at the previous years event, the Midget carrying competition number 202 is being driven by R.H. Day-Dewdney. While the car’s  registration plate is partially concealed, it is likely to be that of FJ 6110, a March or April 1929 Exeter registered car – thus making the Midget a very early production example indeed. The Donald Cowbourne archive lists the car among the MG contingent, although it is described as an 847 cc special, further muddying the waters.

Triple M corner no.220

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The ‘Musketeers’ and ‘Crackers‘ teams were effectively MG factory supported, although the cars were notionally owned by their drivers. They successfully competed in the trials and rallies of the period, their drivers becoming well known, even outside of motor sporting circles. JB 3639 was a 1934 Berkshire registered ‘P Type’ and was owned by R.A. MacDermid. Car and crew are seen here taking part in the first of two special tests on the promenade at the Blackpool Rally, held over 12th-14th June 1936 where MacDermid and JB 3639 went on to earn a First Class award. (LATplate C9118 – courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.219

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

LAT image (B3485) has featured here previously. This edited extract however concentrates on the two MG Midgets at the head of a long line of parked cars, all of which had stopped for breakfast while taking part in the 1930 MCC London-Lands End Trial. The lead 1929 Midget (being refuelled) can be identified from its competition number as being the mount of T.G. Clark who went on to win a Gold award. His car had sensibly been fitted with sidescreens for it’s overnight journey from Slough, the Launceston stop being scheduled for 9-45AM. The second Midget is a 1930 model, RP 8266 (competition no. 221). This one, driven by D. M. Dorr, did not feature among the awards and was retired later that day. (Information courtesy of Donald Cowbourne, photo courtesy of Motorsport Images.)

Triple M corner no.218

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Throughout the thirties, the Scottish Motor Transport Company ran a fleet of buses across Scotland and also published the SMT Magazine in conjunction with the LNER and LMS railway companies. Each edition of the magazine was effectively a travelogue, full of articles relating to places of interest and holiday destinations across the United  Kingdom, its purpose to encourage would be holiday-makers to use their services. Strangely perhaps, the magazine’s pages are also populated with advertisements from car manufacturers and motor traders encouraging the readership to buy cars, effectively dissuading them to use the facilities offered by the magazine’s publishers. However, SMT had this base covered as they also owned a car dealership in Scotland’s capitol city, Edinburgh. This very late SMT MG Midget advertisement appears in the January 1932 edition and depicts a metal panelled model illustrated by Harold Connolly. Does anyone know of a later dated MG ‘M’ Type Midget advertisement?

Triple M corner no.217

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This Bill Brunell image of MG Midget UF 5796 seen here competing in the 1930 Brighton-Beer trial with E. Tebbs at the wheel was first published in the Auto Motor Journal. (see left-hand magazine snippet) The original plate survived and is now part of the Brunell image collection held by the National Motor Museum at Beaulieu.

Triple M corner no.216

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The Spring Shelsley event, held on 27th May 1933, was a damp and dreary affair according to contemporary reports. Surviving photographs confirm this with umbrellas raised and a wet track surface clear to see.  Three MG K3 Magnettes took part, including two of the Mille Miglia machines, one driven by Count Lurani, the second by Fay Taylour, a mount she shared with G.E.T. Eyston. The third Magnette was driven by E.R. Hall, who easily won his class, ascending the hill in 48.00 seconds. This photo is of Miss Taylour’s MG K3 awaiting the signal to start an ascent of the famous 1000 yard course. (LATplate C487 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.215

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

RX 9153 (2M/3150) was a 1932 season metal panelled MG Midget, built towards the end of the model’s production life, being subsequently replaced by the MG J2 later in the year. The panelled M Types were roomier than the earlier fabric skinned versions and this supercharged model was a full 10 MPH quicker, the addition of a blower adding £65 to the asking price over its predecessor. (It sold for £250) This photograph was one of a sequence taken to illustrate an Autocar road test, published 12th February 1932, a copy of which can be found on the MG Midget page, under ‘The cars’ in the open area of the website. (LAT plate E1921, courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.214

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

(LATplate C5789) This shot of MG Magnette BLP 484 was, according to the markings on the plate, taken on Hustyn during the 1935 MCC London-Land’s End Trial. Car and crew (driver: J.H. Hibbitt) appear to be taking a leisurely passage through the ford watched by the customary large crowds at this traditional spring event. (Photo courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.213

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This photo (LATplate C8716) was taken in May 1936 during the running of that year’s MGCC’s Abingdon to Abingdon trial. The Autocar photographer carefully chose his moment to take this photograph of Cecil Kimber who appears to be spectating, although his car is wearing a competition plate. A picnic basket lies open on the hillside adjacent to his female companion.  An enlargement of the image also reveals that Kimber is carrying a 35mm Leica camera – what price a peak at some of his images? The MG Car Club’s official history records this solitary paragraph concerning the event:

June 1936: The Annual Abingdon-Abingdon Trial took place in May, starting as usual from the Factory with a running buffet provided by the company. A novelty this year was a special driving test held in the works grounds before the 110 competitors set off on a 45-mile run before the first of the trials hills. (Photo courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Postscript: Garry Waiting has pointed out that the car, alongside of which Kimber is standing, is a Singer Le Mans and therefore unlikely to be the vehicle he drove to the event!

Triple M corner no.212

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Very little is know about this atmospheric Brooklands image. Its reference number indicates that it was taken in 1932 but the LAT plate number (B9038) is not specifically catalogued by Motorsport Images. The photographer was positioned at the top of the Member’s Banking adjacent to the Member’s Bridge when he took this shot, perfectly capturing the long Railway Straight in the background. The use of the short (1.1 mile) clockwise Mountain Circuit and the lack of spectators might indicate that this was taken at a club meeting while the participants racing numbers may provide clues should a reader have access to the appropriate Brooklands program or race card. The identity of MG Midget no.17 and its driver are of particular interest. (Photo courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.211

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Following on from last week’s TMC image, here is a close up shot of the same MG J3 Midget (JB 2268) photographed en route during the 1933 Alpine Rally. W.E. Belgrave and his co-driver look remarkably refreshed and under-dressed for imminent competition, which might indicate that the driving for the day had yet to be undertaken. (LATplate C1518 – courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.210

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This great photograph of W.E. Belgrave’s MG J3 Midget (JB 2268) speeding through an alpine village was taken at the July 1933 La Coupe Internationale des Alpes rally or Alpine Rally. The event was effectively a trial, although Motor Sport magazine reported that many drivers treated the 2000 kilometre event as a road race. The Alpine route took the cars through France, Switzerland and Italy along some treacherous mountain roads and passes. Belgrave and his 746 cc supercharged Midget won the Group V Coupe des Glaciers award, just pipping Donald Healey in his Riley.  (LATplate C1454 – courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.209

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

On the 9th May 1930 The Autocar published a road test of the development car for the racing M.G. Double Twelve models, which were later to be known in production form as MG Midget 8/45s. It was of course no coincidence that the JCC Double Twelve Race commenced at Brooklands that very day, continuing for a further twelve hours on Saturday 10th May. This car, featured above, was named ‘Shinio’ by H.N. Charles, M.G.’s Chief Engineer “…in honour of the large quantities of metal polish which had been expended on the engine’s internals.” Here the car was used in the header photo for the Autocar test report while a scanned copy of the original artwork from the LAT archive can be seen by way of a comparison. (Lower scan courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no. 208

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

20th April 1935: This photograph was taken on the observed Station Hill section of the 1935 MCC London-Land’s End Trial. Here, A. G. Douglas-Clease pilots his 1934 MG N Type Magnette (JB 3850) up the steep incline, to the delight of the spectators lining the route and his female passenger. (LATplate C5798 – courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.207

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

For the second consecutive week C.A.N. May’s ‘Cream Cracker’ MG PB JB 7521 appears in the TMC spot. Like TMC no.206, this photo (LATplate C10653 extract) was also taken at the 1937 SUNBAC Colmore Trial. (Photo courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.206

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This superb action shot of the C.A.N. May Cream Cracker MG PB (JB 7521) was taken at the 1937 running of the SUNBAC Colmore Trial held on 27th February that year. The car is seen storming one of the hill sections, its knobbly tyres hurling debris from the rough surface skywards. (LATplate C10665 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M Corner no.205

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

There were a record number of starters for the 1934 MCC London-Land’s End Trial with 343 cars leaving Virginia Water during the evening of 30th March. Upon arrival in Devon the following morning they were to be confronted with eight observed hill sections. This photo of MG Magna (MG 2500) was perhaps taken on ‘Lynmouth’, large crowds lining the route from the village below. The Magna was driven by G.M. MacGregor who collected a silver award that day. (LATplate C2905 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.204

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

ALP 363 was a 1933 MG J2 Midget registered in London during August that year. It is seen here taking part in the 1936 MCC ‘Edinburgh’ Trial and is being driven by A.P. Squire, who went on to collect a Premier Award. It’s not known upon which of the observed hills that this photograph was taken. (LATplate C8912 – courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.203

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

MG J2 Midget YY 4 was first registered in London in September 1932 and was owned by A.W.F. Smith (Alan) into the 1960s. This photo of the car was taken somewhere in the Chilterns during the 1935 MG Car Club’s Abingdon to Abingdon Trial. Smith competed in many national trials driving YY 4, from late 1932 until 1937, picking up plenty of awards in the process.  (LATplate C6033 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.202

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

By the 12th December 1931 (the date of that years MCC London-Gloucester trial) MG Midget RX 7206 had been converted from a normally aspirated car and was now supercharged. It’s not clear if the car was converted at the MG factory in Abingdon or by its unknown owner, but many images of it survive in both pre and post conversion mode. By February 1932 MG had officially announced the arrival of a supercharged M Type and The Autocar road tested RX 9153 in that guise. The price premium over the standard model was a whopping £65, customers paying £250 for the privilege. It’s not known how many were sold. Unfortnately, who was driving RX 7206 at that year’s ‘Gloucester’ is unknown, the car’s competition number is presumably attached to the front of the car thus rendering Cowbourne’s book of little help in identifying the driver. (LATplate B7404 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.51

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Cynthia Labouchere‘s name can be found on many rally and concours event entry lists during the early thirties. Although she drove a Singer Nine in 1934, she very actively campaigned a 1932 E.W. Hornet Special throughout the latter half of the 1932 and 1933 driving seasons. Her first recorded event in 1933 was the Monte Carlo Rally, where she started from John o’ Groats’, although sadly failing to finish. This LAT Autocar photoscan shows her Hornet, GY 3131 being inspected prior to the start of the rally, possibly at the Eustace Watkins premises in Chelsea, SW3. (Photo courtesy of Motorsport Images).

Triple M corner no.201

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

During the 1950’s and early 60’s Sunday lunchtime on the BBC’s Light Programme featured a 30 minute music hall spot entitled the ‘Billy Cotton Band Show’.  The band’s popularity went back to the late twenties and continued thereafter, although in the thirties Billy Cotton’s skill behind the wheel of racing cars threatened to eclipse his light entertainment career. This photo of Cotton was taken on 4th July 1936 where he is seen seated behind the wheel of his supercharged MG awaiting the start of a race at Donington Park. (LATplate C9389 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.200

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This photograph was scanned from the pages of a November 1930 SMT Magazine – SMT being an abbreviation for the words,  Scottish Motor Traction, which as its name suggests was a Scottish bus company. Their magazines are packed full of travelogues and details of interesting places to visit around Scotland and the rest of the U.K. https://www.flickr.com/photos/36844288@N00/sets/72157618355483278/ as well as plenty of fascinating motoring advertisements. Here an unidentified MG Midget travels alongside a river or small loch, the caption writer giving very little away.

Triple M corner no.199

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

At the time this photo was taken in July 1937, the MG Midget WX 6937 was already six years old, having first been registered in the West Riding of Yorkshire in 1931. The occasion was the driving test element of the Welsh Rally, which was held over four days (30th June – 3rd July). Here K.G. Settle negotiates a gate under the watching eyes of the adjudicators. The photo was taken by noted photographer Bill Brunell.

Triple M corner no.198

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The later MG Magnette models rarely feature here. To partly correct that anomoly, here is a November 1935 London County Council registered Magnette (CGP 878) being driven by D.E. Harris whilst taking part in the 1937 Colmore Trophy Trial. An intrepid marshall with clipboard in hand closely watches the Magnette’s progress up a long green lane incline. Harris collected a second class award for his efforts that day. (Image scanned from an uncatalogued ‘Motor’ 35mm negative courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.197

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

1932 MG J2 Midget (YY 4) appeared in four of the eight RSAC Scottish Rallies held in the thirties and was driven on each occasion by Alan W.F. Smith. This Motor photo, was taken at a checkpoint during the running of the 1937 ‘Coronation Scottish Rally’ which commenced just five days after the investiture of King Geoge VI on 17th May, the rally concluding on the 21st. Smith was a member of the Motor Cycle Club’s no. 2 team, although Donald Cowbourne’s book British Rally Drivers Their Cars And Awards 1925-1939 doesn’t record if the team were successful or otherwise. (LAT Motor 35mm negative – courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M Corner no.196

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This LAT Collection image (C952) was taken on ‘Doverhay’  on 24th June 1933 during the BHMC’s Brighton-Beer Trial. Unfortunately, Cowbourne can not help identify the driver and passenger of MG no. 34 (ACD 134). Perhaps a Triple M enthusiast can oblige? (Courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Trople M corner no.195

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This scan of LATplate E9340 depicts an MG P Type Midget. A view from the front would help indicate if this is a PA version or the later PB type with the increased capacity engine. The PA was fitted with a honeycombe radiator while the PB version adopted the vertical slats as favoured by the stylists at that time. Perhaps an MG expert can positively identify the model from this profile view? (Photo courtesy Motorsport Images.)

Triple M corner no.194

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Brooklands was the venue for the 1932 JCC Annual Rally and High Speed Trial which took place on a very wet April day. Here an unidentified MG M Type Midget is followed by an Amilcar and a C Type Midget around a barrel marking an extremity of the makeshift course. The crews of all three cars are hunkered down in their cockpits in order to protect themselves from the worst of a torrential downpour. (LATplate B7596 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.193

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Brooklands played host to the BRDC 500 Mile Race on Saturday 24th September 1932. An open event, the race was run in the form of a handicap, with the smaller machines starting first, followed at differing intervals by the larger engine capacity classes. This artistic image from the race was created by Bryan de Grineau who produced similar representations on a weekly basis for The Motor magazine. Here two 746 cc MG Midgets, the red machine driven by R.T. Horton (see also TMC no.189), the light green car by Captain G.E.T. Eyston, are seen dicing high on the famous circuit’s raised banking. Horton’s car went on to win the race outright. (The plate was scanned from the Barre Lyndon book Combat, first published by Heinemann in 1933)

Triple M corner no.192

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The Abbey Coachworks in Merton, Surrey constructed some very stylish bodies during the early thirties, including this two-seater fixed-head sports coupe built upon a 1932 MG Magna chassis. (LATplate E2285 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.191

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This single seat MG C Type special, pictured in the Brooklands pits, was something of a sensation at the 1932 BRDC 500 Miles Race held in September that year. The car was driven R.T. Horton and J.H. Bartlett who eventually won this prestigious race, fighting off challenges from the likes of G.E.T. Eyston (MG), B. Lewis (Talbot) and Malcolm Campbell (Riley). The car covered the 500 miles in a time of 5 hours 42 minutes and 13 seconds at an average speed of 96.29 mph. Sadly the event is chiefly remembered for Clive Dunfee’s fatal crash in an 8 litre Bentley. (LATplate B9118 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.190

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Another TMC photo in a ten image sequence featuring 1931 MG Midget DG 2327. These photos were taken to illustrate an Autocar article on the virtues of the Isle-of-Man as a touring holiday destination for the mainland motorist. This photo, taken on the promenade in Douglas, features two of the horse drawn trams that were used to transport tourists and locals alike along that famous stretch of coastline.(LATplate E3920 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.189

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

EX 127

On 8th February 1932 Capt. G.E.T. Eyston along with Magic Midget EX 127 was at Pendine Sands on the Welsh south coast in an attempt to raise the Goup H ‘flying mile’ record to 120 mph. This, despite the fact that the weather and the condition of the sands were marginal, while Eyston himself was still recovering from serious burns suffered in an earlier record attempt. The target wasn’t achieved that day as the average speed over the each-way attempt was 118.39 mph, although EX127 did reach just over 120 mph on the outward leg. This image has been scanned from the book ‘Combat’, written by Barre Lyndon and published by William Heinemann in 1933. The aircraft seen in the image and mentioned in the caption is a DH 85 Leopard Moth.

Triple M corner no.188

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Sir Francis (F.B.H.) Samuelson was an enthusiastic MG campaigner in the early thirties competing in both Le Mans and Montlhery Midgets. His exploits in a Double-Twelve Le Mans Midget at the la Sarthe and Spa circuits in June 1930 are legendary. The photo seen here of Sir Francis and Freddie Kindell in car no. 29 is very well known and was taken on the eve of the 1930 Le Mans race, as was that of Murton Neale and Hicks in an identical car. (no. 28) Unfortunately, neither car featured among those finishing the race, with even a hint of shenanigans surrounding the failure of Samuelson’s car after just five hours. The Light Car’s report on the race can be found here. (LAT Autocar photoscan – courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.187

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The 1931 JCC Brooklands Double Twelve race held on the 8th & 9th May was an amazing success for the MG factory, although none of the cars entered carried official factory sponsorship! MG C Type Montlhery Midgets occupied the first five places in the overall standings (under a handicap system), while the the three Midgets entered by the Earl of March collected the team prize. Here another C Type (no.72) driven by R.R. Jackson receives frantic servicing attention in the Brooklands pits. Unfortunately, Jackson’s car failed to finish the race. Silent Pathe News film footage of  the race can be seen here. (LAT Autocar photoscan courtesy of Motor Sport Images)

Triple M corner no.186

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Images from the 1932 RAC Ards T.T. race feature here regularly as almost a third of the 34 car field were built in Abingdon. However, just two of the ten cars classified as finishing the race were MG Midgets – Hall in third place with Low in tenth. Here the MG C Type Midget no. 29 driven by Barnes is about to be passed by the Rose-Richards Talbot 105 along a straight stretch of the road circuit. Barnes failed to finish the race after his blower ceased to function. (LATplate B 8897 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.185

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The September 1934 Shelsley Walsh ‘Autumn Hill Climb’ was a damp affair as this re-touched photo of Samuels’s MG Midget testifies. The roosters of spray and the raised brollies held by many spectators in the large crowd are further confirmation if it were needed. Samuels wasn’t among the awards that day. (LAT photoscan – courtesy of Motorsport Images. Photo published on page 631 of 5th October 1934 edition of The Autocar)

Triple M corner no.184

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

In the years running up to the Second World War, Max Millar was perhaps the best known exponent of the art of the automotive cut-away drawing. Here, he has taken on the task of drawing the MG P Type Midget in four-seat form. (LAT collection photo – courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.183

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

1932 Stiles MG F Type Magna ‘Threesome’ special. Arguably the prettiest of the special bodies to be fitted to any MG chassis during the thirties. It was built by Stiles Ltd. their business address being 3, Baker Street, London W.1  See also TMC no.46 (LATplate E2088 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.182

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

JCC Double-Twelve Race Brookland 8th & 9th May 1931

The 1931 ‘Double-Twelve’ race is famous for its top-five clean sweep by a quintet of 746 cc MG C Type Midgets, with the three C Types competing under the Earl of March’s banner also taking the team prize. The 750 cc class represented almost half of the field of 50 cars that year with 10 Austin Sevens competing alongside the 14 MG Montlhery Midgets. Endurance racing is tough on both man and machine and it’s therefore no surprise to find that just 29 cars were still running at the conclusion of the gruelling 24 hour race. Unfortunately, the photographer who took this shot unluckily managed to select three cars that didn’t make it to the finishing line. Here, E. Martin‘s Riley can be seen passing the very smart supercharged MG C Type of the Honourable Mrs Chetwynd, with A.T.G. Gardiner‘s car (70) bringing up the rear. (LATplate B5901 – courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.181

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Yet another heavily retouched photograph from The Autocar magazine, this one from February 1933. The car seen here is the second prototype MG K3 Magnette (JB 1269) which has been fitted with a revised radiator nascelle, that according to a caption (of this same image) in a post-war publication was an “unsightly addittion”. According to the same source, this car was used as a test vehicle for the 1933 Mille Miglia cars. (Photoscan from the LAT collection – courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.180

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This heavily retouched Autocar photo is of an MG C Type Midget being driven by Mrs T.H. (Bill) Wisdom at the Craigantlet Hill Climb, (near Belfast, Northern Ireland) on 14th August 1932. Mrs Wisdom went on to win class III at the event. The photograph appeared in the 19th August 1932 edition of the magazine. (LAT Archive – Autocar photoscan – Courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.50

By Triple M corner

1931 Swallow Wolseley Hornet special Two-seater (RB 3136) was last taxed in the UK in 2007. These four images are all from a carandclassic car listing dating from the spring of 2012 when the car was advertised for sale by a dealer Italy. It looks very much like the car has remained on the continent. The Swallow company were among the first coachbuilders to body the (then) new Hornet chassis.

Triple M corner no. 179

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Yet another photograph from the 1933 RAC TT held at the Ards circuit in Northern Ireland on 2nd September that year. Here, no.19 E.R. Hall in his MG Magnette is seen dicing with W.R. Baird (Riley) at an unknown point on the 13.6 mile road circuit. Hall went on to finish 4th overall and second in his class (behind eventual winner Tazio Nuvolari ) while Baird finished 6th overall and 3rd in his class. (A Motor plate reference 802-42 from the LAT Collection. Photo courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.178

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

F. Gordon Crosby (The Autocar) and Bryan De Grineau (The Motor) were artistic contributors to their respective motoring magazines from the first decade of the twentieth century through to the latter part of the thirties  (De Grineau) and until the commencement of WWII (Crosby). Their work was invariably produced against tight deadlines as they attempted to capture (primarily) sporting action that the camera had missed. Here, in a rare colour image, Crosby records a moment from the 1933 RAC TT as Nuvolari passes the pits in his K3 MG Magnette on his way to a famous victory. The image is a scan of a colour plate from the book Circuit Dust written bt Barre Lyndon and first published by John Miles in 1934.

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.49

By Triple M corner

This snapshot of HY 9201, a mid-1933 Bristol registered Wolseley Hornet Trinity DHC Special, was purchased recently on eBay. It’s likely that the photograph was taken either later on in the thirties or even post war, if the poor condition of the hood material is an indicator. Meredith Coachcraft of Castle Bromwich built the Trinity models and period images of their cars are difficult to find. However, evidence from more recent photographs indicate that at least two of this particular model survive.

Triple M corner no.177

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The racing legend that was Tazio Nuvolari is pictured here on his way to a famous win in his MG Magnette at the 1933 RAC TT, held at the Ards circuit in Northern Ireland. (LATplate Motor 802-39 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.176

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This image is the frontpiece to the Barre Lyndon book Grand Prix, first published by John Miles in 1935. The artwork is unattributed and depicts Sir Malcolm Campbell at the wheel of an MG R Type racing car on the banking at Brooklands.

Triple M corner no.175

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This is H.L. Wardle‘s 1931 Jarvis bodied MG Midget special, the winner of its class prize and third overall at the 1932 Eastbourne Concours event. Jarvis marketed two bodies of similar design for the early Midget, a fabric skinned version as seen here and a metal clad type. The earlier fabric skinned models were distinguishable by their lack of louvered side valances. (LATplate E3899 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.174

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This is the MG K3 Magnette (K3003) that was driven by Capt. George Eyston at the 1933 Mannin Beg race held in Douglas, Isle-of-Man. This race was not the K3’s finest hour with all six cars entered being forced to retire, three with differential failure. Eyston’s K3 retired with vertical drive failure although it was later test driven by S.C.H. Davis for an August 1933 Autocar magazine feature. (LATplates L5870 & 5871 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.173

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The six-cylinder MG K3 enjoys legendary status among aficionados. These two scans from a sequence of five re-touched photographs display the model’s classic lines. (LAT Autocar photoscans courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.172

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

WL 7180 was an early 1929 season MG Midget built in Oxford, prior to the company’s move to Abingdon later that year. It was also something of a celebrity vehicle, appearing on the cover of the Light Car & Cycle Car’s February 21st 1930 edition, while also featuring in a number of other magazine photos and snippets. Throughout 1929 and early 1930, J.V. Hay used it to compete in trials and circuit racing making extensive use of WL 7180’s capabilities. The first of the two photographs to be seen here (LATplate B2257) shows the car taking part in a July 1929 JCC High Speed Trial event at Brooklands, catching an Alvis on a bend of the Mountain Circuit. The second image (LATplate B2981) was taken during the running of the 1929 MCC London-Exeter Trial with WL 7180 climbing ‘Ibberton’ in what look to be dreadful conditions. (Both photos courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.171

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This is a LAT Collection Autocar Photoscan from a May 1936 edition of the magazine, showing 1931 MG C Type (VD 30) taking part in that year’s Abingdon Trial. The car survives and continues to compete in the capable hands of Triple M guru Barry Foster.  (Photo: courtesy Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no. 170

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Only 26 cars entered the 1931 Le Mans 24 hour race and just seven finished. As mentioned in earlier TMCs posts, one of those seven finishers was the MG C type of Sir Francis Samuelson and Freddie Kindell who were left ‘unclassified’ as their final lap took in excess of 30 minutes, contravening a race regulation. The second MG C Type to take part that weekend (Car number 32) was privately entered by the Honourable Mrs Joan Chetwynd who co-drove her car with Henry Stisted. Unfortunately, her Midget was forced to retire on lap 30 with an engine related problem. Neither of the other two cars to be seen in this LAT Collection photo (B6272), BNC no. 27 (Duverne & Girod) or the 4.5 litre Bentley no.7 (Bevan & Couper) made it the finish. (Photo courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.169

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This MG C Type Midget was ‘first-in-class’ and finished 6th overall in the 1933 Le Mans 24 hour race. Here, John Ludovic Ford and Maurice Baumer both of whom shared the driving duties that weekend are feted by the locals, including a gendarme and a race official. (LATplate C869 appears here courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.168

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This well executed action shot of an airborn MG Q Type driven by Tim Davies, appeared on page 524 of the 29th March 1935 edition of The Autocar and was taken at Syston Park during the Inter Varsity Speed Trials. Davies eventually wrested the FTD from K.D. Evans (also Q Type) recording a time of 28.0 seconds over the half mile course. (This LAT photoscan appears here courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.167

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Just two MGs’ were entered for the 1931 Le Mans 24 hour endurance race, car no 31 driven by the Samuelson/Kindell pairing, along with car no. 32 that of the Hon. Mrs Chetwynd and Stisted. Both cars were C Type Midgets. Sadly neither car recorded a ‘finish’, Mrs Chetwynd’s Midget failing on lap 30 with timing gear issues, while the Samuelson/Stisted car completed the race only for the result to be expunged, as the car didn’t complete the last lap in under 30 minutes. Above, Mrs Chetwynd’s C Type is seen passing the 1.5 litre Aston Martin driven by Newsome/Peacock as that car leaves the pits. (LAT Motor Sport film – courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.166

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This photograph was taken at the 1933 running of the Le Mans 24 hour race showing the Hendy-Parker MG J3 leading the Singer Nine of Barnes & Langley somewhere on the Circuit de la Sarthe. Unfortunately, the J3 was among the many DNFs’ that day while just one MG Midget, that of Ford and Baumer took the chequered flag, finishing sixth overall. The Singer however did finish, albeit in thirteenth and last place, covering 1900.9 miles in the process. (LATplate C863 – courtesy of Motorsport Images) 

Wolseley Hornet specials no.48

By Triple M corner

This is an interesting late thirties or early post-war snapshot of a Standard Eight (prepared for re-painting) and what could be a 1930 or 31 Abbey Wolseley Hornet special. The age of the car can be determined by the pre-Magna wheels which were only fitted to 1930 and 31 season models. Why the ‘could be’? This car has a single set of louvres and a cheek-line on its bonnet side, while all other Hornet bonnets of this period had three individual groups of louvres without further decoration. Of course by this time in the car’s life, perhaps eight or nine years after it was built, the original bonnet could have been replaced but there is just a chance that there isn’t a Wolseley badge adorning the radiator on this car.

Triple M corner no.165

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s (Midget, Magna & Magnette) all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The Varsity Speed Trials was an annual event, taking place each spring between teams representing Oxford and Cambridge Universities. In 1930 the event venue was a private estate near Newmarket, Suffolk. Here an unnamed undergraduate heads towards the photographer as he pilots a stripped-down MG Midget, devoid of headlamps, wings, valances and windscreen, yet carrying a passenger? (LATplate B3184 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.47

By Triple M corner

This is another eBay snapshot purchase, although on this occasion in negative form.  The car is a 1932 or 1933 Wolseley Hornet Drophead Coupe Special which was bodied by Eustace Watkins. Unfortunately, the registration number is indistinct (possibly KX – a  Buckinghamshire plate). It’s likely that the photograph was taken toward the latter end of the thirties decade in view of the age of the other vehicles in shot.

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.46

By Triple M corner

The coachbuilding firm of R.E.A.L. was located in Ealing, London W.5 and in the early to mid-thirties the business designed and constructed some extremeley good looking light car bodies, including this 2+2 fixed-head coupe type (seen above) fitted to a 1932 Wolseley Hornet Special chassis. Motor Sport magazine provided a comprehensive description of the model (known as the ‘Patrician’) in its August 1932 edition (page 474) and the car’s art deco interior styling and opulent finish is very apparent in this publicity photograph.

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.45

By Triple M corner

Over the weekend of 14th-18th March 1933 The RAC ‘Hastings’ Rally took place, only the second such running of the event following its inauguration in 1932. In all, 327 cars took part, starting from 9 different venues across the UK, and included among them were 23 Wolseley Hornets. Just three  of these were described as Hornet Coupes, like this 1932 Eustace Watkins example. One of that number was an Arrow Coupe (see Wolseley Hornet Specials no.41),  therefore without a sight of this car’s competition number, (carried on the front) it leaves two possible drivers for this entry, surprisingly both female. So it’s either Mrs M. Vaughn or Miss H. Astbury who is driving *X 9036 on the Stop/Restart test seen taking place here in a Hastings back street. (LATplate B9749 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.164

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

In 1934 MG introduced their Q Type racing car. Apparently, just eight were built and all were powered by the zoller-supercharged OHC 746 cc engine, a development of the Minor’s engine from 1928. While the original Minor engine developed just 20 bhp at 3500 rpm, it’s claimed that the Q Type unit could better 110bhp at 7200 rpm. These cars have lapped the outer circuit at Brooklands at 122 mph, a truly remarkable achievement. Here can be seen an example owned by the Bellvue Garage racing team from Wandsworth, S.W London and driven by Kenneth Evans. The photo was taken at Donington Park on 11th May 1935 by Bill Brunell.

( An apology – It has been pointed out that the second cutaway image that initially appeared here was of a 6-cylinder K3 and Not a Q Type. The caption editor has been fired!)

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.44

By Triple M corner

1933 Windover Hornet fixed-head-coupe

The Windover coachbuilding concern were renown for the quality of their car bodies, the majority of their customers owning opulent up-market vehicles. The fixed-head-coupe body on a 1933 Wolseley Hornet Special chassis as seen here, perfectly illustrates this, particularly the well appointed interior of the car. While the body styling is unadventourous, its clean lines are pleasing on the eye. (Both images from The LAT Collection, courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.163

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This unidentified (perhaps VB 98**) MG Midget Sportsman’s Coupe is seen taking part in the 1931 running of the MG Car Club Trial. The driver was AS Curtis while the photographer was none other than the prolific Bill Brunell. What is interesting about this photo is that the coupe’s neatly designed sunshine roof is in the open position, the only such image in the archive. The front bumper was a non-standard fitment and does nothing for the looks of the car, while the trafficators and spotlight affixed to the ‘A’ pillar are further visual distractions. The large calormeter and wings coupled with the full-length sunvisor might indicate that Mr. Curtis enjoys embellishing his car. What is evident is the effectiveness of the rear-wing mud shield. This is simply an extention of the door. While mud and road dirt collect here, when the door is opened, it swings clear of the clothes of those entering or leaving the vehicle. (Is that a bird on the scuttle?)

Triple M corner no.162

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Despite its recent arrival on the scene, by the time this photo was taken (17th August 1935) the Donington circuit was already an established motor sport venue, having staged it’s first meeting race meeting just 30 months earlier. Its central location meant enthusiasts from the Midlands and North of England could now see the top drivers in action without the need to travel to the south-west of London and the Brooklands circuit to do so. The cars lined-up in this LAT collection photo (C7225) are taking part in the first event of the day, a five lap handicap. Eight cars were entered, just six made it to the start line and Ken Wharton’s  Austin Seven (no.33) rolled on the first corner, fortunately without injury to the driver. After this incident the race was won easily by D.S. Handley in his MGC’ Type Midget (no.30). A full report on the race and the rest of the meeting can be found on page 501 of the September 1935 edition of Motor Sport magazine. (Photo courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.161

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

These two recently acquired images depict a mid-1930 Carlisle registered MG M Type Midget (HH 5340). The photo was possibly taken in the late forties or fifties, the Midget having undergone a skin transplant at some point, losing its original fabric covering and being reclad in steel or aluminium, while the owner’s garments also hark back to that period. The car’s scuttle provides the clue to its re-skinning , where a neat row of rivet heads can be seen joining the scuttle top to the side. (The factory produced, metal clad car did not make its debut until the 1931 season). As to why the Union flag is being displayed on the property opposite is open to conjecture, perhaps to celebrate the coronation of 1953, or the end of WWII ?

Triple M corner no.160

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Donington Park 12th May 1934: A hectic start to one of the feature races that day showing a solitary Ford Eight Special, driven by T.C. Harrison, leading a smoking pack of six MGs away from the line. The three Midgets with visible competition numbers were driven by; 19 J.R. Grice, 21 W.G. Everitt and 26 P.H. Lim. (LATplate C3411 – courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.159

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

On Friday 8th and Saturday 9th May 1930 the Junior Car Club hosted the ‘British Double Twelve Hour Race’ at the Brooklands circuit. At this event a five-car MG Midget team created a considerable stir by winning the team prize, following a fierce battle with the much fancied Austin Seven team. The team Midgets that took part that day were all identical adaptations of the standard production versions, their team victory boosting sales of the model. Following this event, the five cars went on to compete throughout 1930 and beyond. One of these team cars can be seen here, taking part and in the thick of the action at the JCC ‘Member’s Day’ event on Saturday 5th July 1930. The question is, which of the five is it? (Edited extract from LATplate B4388 – courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.158

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

A.P. Squire‘s 1933 MG J2 Midget (ALP 363) is seen here competing in the 1936  MCC London-Edinburgh Trial (29th & 30th May) on one of the four ‘observed’ hills, these being, Park Rash, Summer Lodge, Wrynose Pass and Hard Knott Pass. He gained a Premier Award. (LATplate C8912 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.157

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This is a Bill Brunell image of RX 8306, a 1931 MG C Type. A present day survivor, RX 8306 had an extremely varied competition career during the early thirties. Here the car is taking part in  what is believed to to be the 1932 running of the Inter Varsity Trial, driven by H.S. Linfield, the editor of the Autocar magazine. It also took part in circuit racing at Brooklands, hill climbing at Shelsley, speed trials at Lewes, and was driven on Pendine sands by G.E.T. Eyston in a class H ‘Flying Mile’ record attempt on 4th January 1932. It’s currently owned by Chris Cadman who continues to race the car in VSCC and other historic events.

Triple M corner no.156

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Date: 13th May 1933 Venue: Donington Park – Second Donington Meeting. E.R. ‘Eddie’ Hall’s C Type Midget leads R.F. Turner’s Austin Seven Sports in the 3rd event of the day at the recently opened Donington circuit. The  5-lap race lasted just 11 minutes & 28 seconds with Hall comfortably beating Turner’s Austin Seven, which finished 2nd. Later that afternoon, Hall won the 5th event, another 5-lapper, in 11minutes 24 seconds,  4 seconds quicker than in event 3. Consistency personified. (LAT ‘Motor’ plate 807-12 courtesy Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.155

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

On 13th July 1934, in bright mid-summer sunshine, R.L. Doble was taking part in the Llandudno Trial aboard MG J2 GV 2183 (J4231). He is seen here passing a public house on “Badfort” on his way to collecting a Premier Award. (LAT Autocar photoscan – courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no. 154

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

There are at least six surviving Autocar and Temple Press images of YY 4, a September 1932 London registered MG J2 Midget. In all cases the car is taking part in one of the major trials of the day and is being driven by A. W. F. Smith. Smith presumably purchased the car new from University Motors or Jarvis of Wimbledon, the two major suppliers of MG cars in London. This photo was taken during the 1933 MCC London-Lands End Trial where Smith gained a Premier Award. The event took place in glorious weather and attracted huge crowds who lined either side of the test hill routes “ten deep in places”, according to contemporary reports. (While ‘Cowbourne’ records Smith’s first initial as ‘A’, elsewhere he is referred to as J.W.F Smith) (LATPlate C0003 – courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.153

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The 1934 Mannin Beg race, held on an ‘around-the-houses’ course in Douglas, Isle-of-Man was an MG Magnette tour de force. with the top five places all being filled by the model. It could have been a very different story had Freddie Dixon (Riley) not ran out of fuel while leading the race just a few miles from the chequered flag. Norman Black went on to win, while George Eyston (single-seat Magnette), seen here on Douglas Promenade leading Dixon very early in the race, eventually finished third. (LAT Autocar photoscan – courtesy Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.152

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

W.S. Whittard was behind the wheel of this MG J2 Midget (DG 5458), while taking part in the Sunbac Colmore Trial on 24th February 1934, the photo being taken on Gypsy Lane. Whittard was also to take part in all five remaining Colmore Trials prior to the outbreak of WWII, on each occasion driving an MG. Unfortunately, in the year this photograph was taken he failed to collect an award. (LAT Autocar photoscan – courtesy of Motorsport Images.)

Wolseley Hornet Specials No.43

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Wolseley Hornet Specials no.41 featured a full-frontal photograph of a 1933 Arrow Foursome Coupe. This artist’s impression of that model was extracted from an Arrow Coachworks advertisement, (scanned from a March 1933 Motor magazine) and provides a side-on profile view of the car. Its design has some similarities to the 1930 two-seat Arrow Hornet Coupe (also seen here) and carries over the louvered wing valances to be seen on the earlier vehicle. The complete March 1933 Motor item featuring this model has been added to the Wolseley Hornet Sports & Specials page within the members area of the website.

Triple M corner no.151

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

What is a 1930 Cumberland registered MG Midget (RM 7401) doing on a dirt road somewhere in Queensland? The answer will undoubtedly be found on page 627 of the 13th April 1934 edition of The Autocar as the reverse of this heavily retouched Motorsport Images photoscan reveals that this photo accompanied a letter from Gerald Garden on the Correspondence page.

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.42

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The London based Corsica coachbuilding concern produced many stunning bodies for predominantly upmarket customer’s cars, including examples from Bentley, Alfas Romeo, Mercedes-Benz and Rolls Royce. They also produced at least three body styles for the Wolseley Hornet chassis. The first of these was a beautiful futuristic looking open two-seater featuring a large well proportioned hinged tail inside of which was kept the spare wheel. The second such body was the 2+2 Sports Drop-head Coupe as seen here. (LAT Autocar photoscan January 1933) Of more traditional design than its stablemate, its swept front wings and louvered side-valances hinted at a sporty performance while the wheel discs and P100 style headlamps added a touch of opulence perhaps more associated with the marques mentioned earlier. It wasn’t cheap and sold at £297-10s but was very well equipped. A four-seater touring version was also built, this featuring a traditional hood and cut-away doors. (Photo courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.150

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

J. B. Carver was a young Oxford undergraduate who took part in a series of national trials* between 1930 and 1932. His car of choice was a 1930 London registered MG Midget GC 5505. This Bill Brunell photo was taken on 12th December 1931 during the MCC’s London-Gloucester Trial. Despite requiring assistance on this hill(?) Carver gained a Silver Medal.

(*Carver took part in the 1930 & 31 MCC London Gloucester, the 1932 Sunbac ‘Colmore’, and the 1930 & 31 Inter Varsity Trials)

Triple M corner no.149

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

LATplate B8920 was taken at the conclusion of the 1932 RAC Ulster TT at the Ards circuit. Here the Managing Director of the MG Car Company, Mr. Cecil Kimber is seen photographed alongside the MG C Type Midget which was driven by E.R. Hall into third position overall, behind the two Riley Nines of Whitcroft and Eyston. (Photo courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.148

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This shot was taken at the 1932 running of the RAC T.T. on the Ards circuit in Northern Ireland. Here, two MG C Type Midgets, driven by S.A. Crabtree (No.28) and F.S. Barnes (No.29) hurtle across a town square (perhaps Comber?) towards a bank of totally unprotected spectators. The tail of another C type (No.32) driven by Goldie Gardner, can just be seen exiting the square to the right. (LAT collection B8869 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.147

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Captain F.H.B. Samuelson and his wife took part in the 1931 Monte Carlo Rally driving a 1931 season metal paneled MG Midget Sportman’s Coupe (RX 7429), covering just over 1000 miles following departure from the John 0′ Groats rally control point. Upon arrival, they were classified 8th in the under 1100 cc class but picked-up first prize in the under 1100 cc ‘Closed Car’ Comfort Competition. The car is seen here (centre background) in a queue of competition winners awaiting presentation of their awards by the  principalities dignataries. This previously unpublished image is from the LAT collection (Plate B5387) and appears here courtesy of Motorsport Images.

Wolseley Hornet specials no.41

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While coachbuilders’ A.P. Compton had built Arrow Coupe bodies for the Wolseley Hornet, by the time this car was registered (early 1933) Compton’s original company had been sold. The new concern remained at the old Hanwell tram depot base and continued to body Wolseley Hornets, among others. The Hornet Coupe featured here was bodied by Compton’s successors, Arrow Coachworks Ltd and was of a design not seen previously. Unfortunately, there are no profile shots available and their period advertisements don’t illustrate this version. This LAT image B9721 of Hornet AHX 415 was taken during the 1933 RAC ‘Hastings’ Rally and shows entry no. 145, driven by D.W. Thompson negotiating traffic in the town centre of Hastings. (Photo courtesy Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.146

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Two images, both taken at Donington Park prior to the start of a ladies race in 1935 show Doreen Evans in the cockpit of her Q Type MG. (LATfilm Motor L197-18 & L197-20 courtesy Motorsport Images)

Triple M Corner no.145

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This scan from a newly discovered Motor magazine 35 mm negative shows MG Midget EX135 at speed on an autobahn near Dessau, Germany, where in May 1939 the car broke a series of records. Below, can be found the National Archives potted biography of the driver, which tells of an exciting life both in the motoring record breaking realm and also away from it.

Alfred Thomas Goldie Gardner was born on May 31st 1890 in Essex, his mother’s maiden name being Goldie. His early motoring interest lay in motorcycles but the First World War interrupted his ambition to race them, and on the outbreak he joined the army, becoming the youngest Major in the British Forces. In 1917 his reconnaissance plane was brought down by enemy fire and he sustained leg and hip injuries that were to hospitalise him for two years and leave him disabled for the rest of his life. In this condition he began motor racing in 1924 and in 1930 he came to the attention of Cecil Kimber the managing director of M.G. and subsequently raced various of these cars with considerable success. In 1934 he bought a streamlined K3 Magnette and after accompanying Sir Malcolm Campbell to Daytona Beach to set a new Land Speed Record, his appetite was whetted for record-breaking, starting with a class record at Brooklands. In 1937 he went to Dessau in Germany where he created a new Flying Mile Record at 148.5mph.. He went on to set further records at Montlhery in France and returned to Germany later in the year to set new records. He now had in mind achieving 200mph for which purpose George Eyston’s Magic Magnette Ex 135 was acquired and modified to produce 196bhp. In November 1938 he returned to Germany and raised the record to 186mph. With the 200mph target still eluding him, in May 1939 he returned yet again to take the 1100cc record to 203mph, and with the engine rebored overnight he also took three 1500cc Class ‘F’ records. Further attempts at the 750cc records were stymied by the outbreak of war, and he first of all joined with Sir Malcolm Campbell in setting up the Mobile Special Constabulary (The Blue Birds) and then helped reorganise civilian transport in liberated Europe. Once the war had ended new Class ‘H’ (750cc) records were achieved in Italy and at Jabbeke, Belgium and then in 1947 Class ‘I’ (500cc) records were set, and in 1948 a Jaguar 2-litre experimental engine was borrowed to set Class ‘E’ (2000cc) records. This allowed him to claim records in 50% of the World International Classes. Further record-breaking continued at Jabbeke and in the USA through 1950-2 but in 1952 he suffered a cerebral haemorrhage and was forced to retire. He was holder of the OBE and received three BRDG Gold Stars. He died in 1958.

Photo courtesy of Motorsport Images

Triple M corner no.144

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

G.W. Wright took part in the 1932 Monte Carlo Rally in this MG C Type Midget (GP 2913). The photograph was taken in low light somewhere in London prior to car and crew setting off for France where they finished 12th in their class. They fared significantly better in the post rally Mont des Mules hill climb where they topped the listing in the 750 cc class. Just 14 months after this photograph was taken, Wright’s C Type was to dramatically catch fire at Brooklands. (see Triple M corner no.83 in the archive) Photo courtesy of Motorsport Images

Triple M corner no.143

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The 1933 JCC Iternational Trophy Race took place on Saturday 6th May at Brooklands and was held in glorious sunshine in front of a large crowd. The racing did not disappoint with household names such as Malcolm Campbell, Lord Howe and Kaye Don taking part along with G.E.T Eyston who was driving the Magic Midget. Here, The Autocar’s talented artist Gordon Crosby captures the moment Eyston’s Midget looses its rear wheel along the start/finish straight just three laps into the race. (Click on the arrows in the trhc to read Motor Sport’s account of the incident.) (LAT photoscan from Autocar 12th May 1933 – courtesy Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.142

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Donington Park 19th August 1933: Taken at McClean’s, this LAT archive image (C1597) shows a gaggle of MG’s including the dicing J2 Midgets of C.H. Masters (no.3) and J.R. Grice (no.15) as they round the bend. Following a short distance behind is a 1933 McEvoy Minor Special (no.12) being driven by Richard Jenson, the car’s body having been built by the Jenson brothers in Wolverhampton to a Michael McEvoy specification. Jenson finished 5th, in this the opening event of the day. (Ed. This image is something of a discovery in that it’s the first such identifiable image of a McEvoy Minor being driven by either of the Jenson brothers to be found by the author.) Photo courtesy of Motor Sport Images. More about the Jenson Brothers here.

Triple M corner no.141

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This heavily doctored image first appeared on page 364 of the 1st September 1933 edition of The Autocar magazine. It depicts a 1934 season MG Magnette pillarless saloon (JB 550) which, as can be seen from the neatly handwritten caption sold for £445 or the equivalent of three lwb Minor Saloons (at £150 each) and £50 more than Morris Motors top-of-the-range Morris 25 Saloon, these cars selling for £395. Despite the MG’s elegance, many of the comparatively few that were built were later converted to open cars. (LAT Autocar photoscan coutesy of Motorsport Images) JB 550 survives to this day and is listed on the DVLA database as a 1932 ‘green’ MG, although the body type is not detailed.

Triple M corner no.140

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

On what was a beautiful mid-April day in 1933 the all female crew of this MG Magna MG 1452 climb an unknown hill while taking part in that year’s WASA Cotswold Trial. (LAT Autocar Photoscan 14th April 1933 – courtesy Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.139

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Dennis Evans, sibling to Doreen and Kenneth, also both active competitors in motor sport, is seen here in his MG N Type Magnette (BLL 493) competing at the 1936 Inter-Varsity speed trials at Syston Park in Lincolnshire. The family’s cars were all maintained by the Bellvue Garage Racing Dept. in Wandsworth, London

Triple M corner no.138

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The 1933 RAC Ulster TT is considered as being something of an epic in the annals of road-racing motorsport. It was of course the race in which the Italian ace Tazio Nuvolari took his maiden victory in an MG K3 Magnette but not without a terrific duel with Hugh Hamilton who was driving a supercharged 746cc MG Midget. Hamilton pushed Nuvolari all the way, a ‘splash and dash’ five laps fom the finish perhaps costing him victory. Here, Hamilton is seen passing Comber Station almost two thirds of the way around the 13.6 mile circuit, his race average speed being a remarkable 73.46 mph. (Photo: courtesy LAT collection – Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.137

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The Triple M series of MG’s (Midget, Magna & Magnette) all belong to a family of models that commenced with the introduction in 1929 of the MG (M Type) Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The Donington Park race circuit was host to just its third motor race meeting on Saturday 19th August 1933. Entries were significantly up on the two earlier events, held in March and May that year, while the beautiful summer weather attracted a large crowd to the new venue. This photo shows the MG J2 of Tom Simister leading a similar car driven by C. H. Masters in the very early stages of the first race that day, Simister being required to retire his car after just three laps into the five lap race. Masters went on to finish second behind W.G. Everett, also in a J2, while another Midget driven by Grice, finished third. (LATplate C1601 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.136

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Italian racing driver Tazio Nuvolari had never driven an MG K3 Magnette until the eve of the 1933 RAC Ulster TT race. While 29 cars started the 478 mile race just 12 finished with Nuvolari beating all comers, including  fourth placed Eric Hall, who was piloting an identical car.  The race lasted for almost six hours and was not without tragedy when the passenger in Balmain’s MG Midget was killed having been thrown from the car as a result of an accident. It’s reported that over 500,000 people lined the Ards course that day, many no doubt coming to watch local man Billy Sullivan driving his Sullivan Minor Special. Unfortunately, Sullivan was forced to retire after just 191 miles or 14 laps of the circuit. Nuvolari is seen here at the end of the race casually eating an apple just prior to the presentation ceremony. (Image from the LAT collection, Motor plate 802-37 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.135

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

JB 552 is a late 1932 Berkshire registered MG J2 this photo being taken on 10th December that year, during the course of the London – Gloucester Trial.  The almost new car is about to enter a section under the watchful eyes of the marshalls’ while being driven by A.C. Hess, who wasn’t among the awards that day. (LAT Autocar photoscan – courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.40

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Trinity‘ specials were constructed by Meredith Coachcraft of Birmingham and were thus named as all their cars had three-in-one bodies: open four- or two-seater with disappearing head, or closed four-seater. The model illustrated here is seen in closed four-seater form and is one of just nine Wolseley Hornets so converted, this one from late 1932. (LAT photoscan Autocar 9th December 1932 edition – courtesy Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.134

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

MG J2 Midget RX 9980 was the factory’s press car, featuring in most of the material to be seen at the car’s launch in early August 1932.  This image was taken some four month later on December 10th. On this occasion it was being driven by A.W.F. Smith in the London-Gloucester Trial where Smith picked up a Silver Cup award. This certainly wasn’t the car’s only competitive outing as images exist of it taking part in the following year’s (Feb 33) Colmore Trial, this time being driven by J. Temple. (LAT Autocar photoscan courtesy of Motorsport Images.)

Triple M corner no.133

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This great photo of an unidentified MG C Type Montlhery Midget was taken at a damp Donington Park on 24th March 1934. This was the first meeting on the newly extended course, its length now being 2 miles 1000 yards. (LATplate C2828 courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.132

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This MG K3 Magnette (K3004) is photographed outside of the Squire Motors works in Henley-upon-Thames, Berks. Those standing behind are Jock Manby-Colegrave (left) and Adrian Squire, the owner of the business. The car was to be used in competition driven by Manby-Colegrave. Squire manufactured expensive sportscars for a short period in the mid-thirties, just seven being produced, before going to the wall in 1936. (Main image, LAT collection Motor Sport magazine. Squire photo, scanned from re-touched Autocar print dated May 1936 Both photos courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M Corner no.131

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The Isle of Man hosted the ‘Mannin’ races between 1933 and 1935 on what was a street circuit around the island’s capital, Douglas. The races were intended to replicate the thrills of the Monaco Grand Prix, which had been introduced to the calendar in 1929. The very first of this new series of races, The Mannin Beg, took place on 12th July 1933, the field consisting primarily of MGs’ and Rileys’, although ‘Billy’ Sullivan’s Morris Minor also took part. The race was dominated by a duel for the lead between Kaye Don and H.C. Hamilton, both driving MG Magnettes with Don becoming one of the 13 retirees from the 16 car field. Hamilton was also also a casualty, when on lap 40 of 50 he was forced to retire from leading the race with rear axle problems. This LAT photo C1058 shows Hamilton at speed, only a few feet away from an unprotected throng of spectators. (Just 13 months later, on August 26th 1934, Hamilton was killed whilst competing in a Maserati at the Swiss Grand Prix in Bern.)

Triple M corner no. 130

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

G.E.T. Eyston was a prolific motoring record-breaker throughout the thirties decade, included among which was the World Land Speed Record, held on three separate occasions in ‘Thunderbolt’. He set many other records in MGs’ and here he is seen on Pendine Sands on 4th January 1932 about to undertake an attempt on the ‘flying mile’. His vehicle of choice for this attempt was RX 8306, a 1931 MG C Type Midget. The car survives and is now in the custodianship of Chris Cadman, who continues to use it in competition, but not as far as it is known, for record-breaking attempts. (Re-touched image courtesy of LAT – Autocar photoscan)

Triple M corner no.129

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Liverpool registered 1931 MG ‘C’ Type Midget (KF 5114) has featured here previously (see Triple M corner no. 32) and this second profile image was taken at that same photo-shoot. The beautifully proportioned 750 cc ‘C’ Type was an extremely successful competion car and was developed from Eyston’s record breaker EX 120. The short stroke supercharged engine was eventually tuned to develop 52.4 bhp @ 6500 rpm.

Triple M corner no.128

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The 1931 MAC Shelsley Walsh Open Meeting was held on July 11th, just a few short weeks after the final Double-Twelve event was held at Brooklands. It was at that Brooklands event that the team of 750 cc supercharged MG ‘C’ Type Montlhery Midgets swept all before them, as well as providing the outright winner. To capitalise on this success, two cars from that all-conquering team were demonstrated to the large Shelsley crowd that day and can be seen here ascending the hill together, driven by Hall and Eyston, hence ‘H’ and ‘E’. A cropped version of this image first appeared in the August 1931 edition of Motor Sport magazine on page 470. (Photo courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.127

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This Motor Sport magazine image was taken at the MAC ‘Open’ meeting at Shelsley Walsh in 1932. The MG C Type Midget is seen approaching the Crossing and could either be RX 8306 or RX 8586, its competition number obscuring part of the number plate. The photo is from the LAT collection and appears here courtesy of Motorsport Images.

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.39

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GX 8765 is a 1932 London registered Wolseley Hornet EW Daytona Special. The car is being driven here by F.S. Hutchens who at that time was the Sales Manager for Eustace Watkins (as well as being secretary of the Hornet Car Club) and who had seen plenty of competitive success at Brooklands and elsewhere driving his employer’s products.  Here, he is seen competing at the Brighton Speed Trials of 1932 and was to follow this up in January of 1933 by taking part in the Monte Carlo Rally, also in GX 8765. (Photo courtesy Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.126

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

On 13th May 1933 a motor race meeting was held at Donington Park for just the second time, the 2.25 mile circuit’s inaugural meeting having taken place on 25th March that year. Here car no. 25, Eric Hall’s MG C Type Midget passes under a narrow ornamental bridge at one of the circuits ‘no passing sections’. Mr. Hall went on to win two of the seven events to be held that day, in front of an audience reported by Motor Sport to be in the region of 10,000 souls. Photo courtesy of Motorsport Images – source LAT archive.

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.38

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McEvoy Hornet Specials frequently appeared high in the result listings of the well known trials of  the period. This 1931 model GK 4084, driven by A.J.G. Bochaton was one such car. Bochaton used GK 4084 exstensively throughout the period 1934-1937 and appeared in all the major trials excepting the ‘Colemore’, gaining a number of top awards. Here his slightly battered car is being driven through a Devonshire wood during the course of the 1934 Brighton-Beer Trial which was held in excellent weather on the 17th June that year.

Triple M corner no.125

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Following on from the MG PA depicted in Triple M corner no.124 is this MG J3 Midget (JB 1047) which was featured in a  road test article in the May 1933 edition of Motor Sport magazine. (pages 325/326) The 750 cc J3 reputedly had a top speed of 93 mph and was supercharged via a Powerplus 6A unit. A heavier duty crankshaft to that fitted to the J2 was required in order to cope with the forces associated with a power unit that could spin to 5500 rpm. The test was carried out at Brooklands in the early spring of that year in weather conditions that could not be described as ideal, neverless the reporter was fulsome in his praise of the car’s performance. (Photos courtesy of Motorsport Images)

Triple M corner no.124

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The final versions of the pre-war four-cylinder OHC engined MG Midgets were the PA and PB models. The PA model was introduced in late 1933, replacing the J series and now had an improved  three bearing crankshaft enabling the safer use of higher engine revolutions, while the PB of 1935 was endowed with a larger capacity 939 cc OHC engine, a further development of the PA’s unit. The car shown here, MG PA – JB 4157, was first registered in Berkshire in 1934. (Both photographs courtesy of Motor Sport Images)

Triple M corner no.123

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The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The 1931 Irish Grand Prix at Phoenix Park, Dublin was held over the weekend of 6th and 7th June. On a wet Saturday 6th, cars with an engine capacity of under 1500 cc took part, competing for the Saorstat Cup. The race was to be dominated by the new MG Montlhery C Type Midgets, fresh from their astonishing success at the final running of the Brooklands ‘Double-Twelve’ event which had taken place less than a month earlier. Motor Sport magazine carried an extensive report on the event which was won overall by Norman Black in an Earl of March entered Midget. They also published this photo in their July 1931 edition with the following caption. “Wet going in the first day’s race. Two MG’s in close formation, the drivers are (31) H.D. Parker and (35) R.T. Horton.” This restored photo courtesy Motorsport Images Ltd.

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.37

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The value of tagging and captioning images stored away on your hard-drive, on in the cloud, becomes apparent when something triggers a ‘ringing a bell’ moment. In this case it was the the GX registration of this recently uncovered photograph of a 1932 Abbey Trophy Hornet  Special (GX 1827), found within the Motor Sport magazine images section of the LAT collection. A search of the Network’s archive revealed a later snapshot of the car with its probable owner alongside. Was he the first owner of the car? Did he compete in it? The search also revealed that the car was the subject of a Light Car magazine road test in May 1932, a PDF of which resides in the document archive on the Wolseley Hornet Specials page. This page can be found within the Member’s Area of the website. Sadly, the car is not a survivor but a little of its semi-illustrious early history is now known. (L/H Image courtesy of Motor Sport Images)

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Triple M corner no.122

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Yet another Bill Brunell photograph courtesy of Motorsport Images. This one was taken in the afternoon of 19th June 1932 during the course of that year’s running of the B&HMC’s Brighton – Beer reliability trial. Here Brunell captures T.A.W. Thorpe in his 1930 MG Midget GF 5503 cresting a gradient in a sunken lane near Fingle Bridge on Dartmoor. Thorpe went on to gain a second class award. The photo appeared in the 24th June 1932 edition of The Autocar on page 1055. (LAT photoscan)

Triple M corner no. 121

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

MG 768 was an MG 12/12 Midget owned and driven by Viscount Curzon. This photo was taken by well known motoring photographer Bill Brunell during the course of the 1931 Inter -Varsity Trial, along an unmetalled lane in the Chiltern Hills, near Marlow, Bucks.

Triple M corner no.120

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

1930 MG Midget VR 9032 was first registered in Manchester in 1930. However, establishing just when this photograph was taken is not quite so easy to ascertain. A good bet is the thirties decade, in that the car looks to be in excellent condition and in particular, the Dunlop three stud tyres appear to be almost new. What can be seen of the driver’s clothing doesn’t provide much assistance although the beret is a very sensible choice of headgear, fashionable at that time and which will at least remain on if caught in the car’s slipstream, unlike a peaked cap. The tax disc informs that the photo was taken prior to 1959 when a major design change to that document took place (http://www.britishtaxdiscs.co.uk/tax-disc-history.php) although the rear view mirror appears to be a motorcycle type of a type popular during the fifties and early sixties.

Triple M corner no.119

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This recently discovered re-touched image of a 1930 MG 8/33 Midget Sportsman’s Coupe was first seen on the pages of The Autocar magazine in the spring of that year. Although the detail is not particularly clear it does show the general layout of the cockpit area to good effect. (LAT Autocar photoscan)

Triple M corner no.118

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

A huge crowd congregated in Blue Hills Mine, Cornwall on 4th April 1931 to witness cars and crews negotiating (or otherwise) the twists, turns and climbs of that cavernous man-made arena. All were competing in the 1931 running of the MCC London-Lands End trial. The image to be seen here shows A. G. Murdoch in his 1930 MG Midget MG 644 hitting a bank at one such sharp turn. Murdoch went on to eventually collect a Silver award. (LAT Autocar photoscan – this image first appeared in that magazine’s 10th April 1931 edition)

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.36

By Triple M corner

Major D.E.M. Douglas-Morris was a prolific rallyist & trialist throughout the thirties decade. He took part in all eleven Monte-Carlo Rallies betwen 1929 and 1939, six of the eight pre-war RAC rallies and over 20 of the major trials of the period. Here his 1931 Wolseley Hornet EW Hornet Coupe De-Luxe is pictured taking first prize at one of the south coast concours events (Eastbourne 1931) while parked alongside another Hornet coupe special, possibly bodied by the Surrey coachbuilder, Hoyal. (Autocar photoscan)

Wolsely Hornet specials no.35

By Triple M corner

Throughout the twenties, thirties and beyond, the majority of Britain’s coastal resorts had photographic studios from which street photographers plied their trade, speculatively  capturing holiday makers on celluloid. If they could persuade their subjects to part with some of their holiday money, photoprints would rapidly be produced so that their customers could take the prints home at the end of their stay to show family and friends. Some of these studios included a semi-permanent ‘set’ in which cars and other props were placed against a painted back-drop. The use of parts of genuine cars as props was commonplace as were model vehicles. It’s clear from this photo (taken in Blackpool) that a Swallow Hornet Special is being represented although its small scale ensures the occupants look like giants!

Triple M corner no.117

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This scan from a 1931 Motor Sport film negative shows off this MG factory photo of their ‘C’ Type Montlhery Midget to good effect.

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.34

By Triple M corner

F. Allott competed in many of the major trials throughout the thirties and for three of those years 1932, ’33  and ’34 his car of choice was a Patrick bodied Wolseley Hornet Special. These images were both taken during the course of the October 1933 running of the MCC Sporting Trial for which Allott collected a Silver Award.  His Hornet (MG 2239) can be seen climbing the Rosedale Chimney gradient in an image that was published (or perhaps re-published) in the June 1944 edition of Light Car, the magazine having moved from a weekly publication to monthly as a result of wartime shortages. The second heavily re-touched Autocar image (LAT photoscan) was taken on Scarborough promenade and shows MG 2239 taking part in the driving tests element of the trial.

CLICK ON AN IMAGE TO ENLARGE

Triple M corner no.116

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This photograph of the Honourable Mrs. Chetwynd and H.H. Stisted‘s MG C Type Midget was taken on Saturday 13th June 1931 at the famous la Sarthe circuit during the course of the 24 Heures du Mans. The Stisted/Chetwyn car completed just 30 laps before being forced into retirement and was one of the 20 cars to be unclassified from among the 26 starters. The lack of spectator and crew protection at the circuit is clear to see, both from this photograph and contemporary images to be found on the internet and elsewhere. (LATplate B6269A)

Triple M corner no.115

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

F. Fsorza took part in the majority of the major trials between 1931 and 1933 competing in either a Lea Francis or, as seen here, his MG Magna (MG 1419). This photograph was taken at the 1932 running of the MCC London-Lands End event held over 25th & 26th March and was published on P249 of the April edition of Motor Sport magazine. The concise caption reads, “F. Fsorsa’s Magna comes to grief on the first bend of Grabhurst” . He failed to collect an award that day. (LAT Motor Sport negative)

Triple M corner no.114

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

There are many talented automotive artists currently practising their skills and Bruce Thomson is up there among the best. This depiction of a 1934 MG PA Midget was discovered on Bruce’s website and was sketched during a brief stay at the Three Horseshoes in Thursley, Surrey. His website is well worth a prolonged look.

Triple M corner no.113

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The MG Car Company’s founder and chief executive throughout the thirties was Mr. Cecil Kimber. His personal transport for a short time during this period was this Corsica bodied, supercharged MG Magnette. The image is a scan of a photograph from an Autocar ‘edition file’ which appears here courtesy of LAT, while the small snippet and caption was found on the internet.

Triple M corner no.112

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

RX 8306 was one of just 44 MG C Type Midgets built between 1931 and 1932. They were manufactured specifically with circuit racing in mind and the model’s design was based around that of the record breaking EX120 ‘Magic Midget’, driven by George Eyston in early 1931 at Brooklands, Montlhery and Pendine. These two images show the layout of the cockpit area of the 743 cc sohc racing car. These photos are two of a sequence of five taken for The Autocar magazine and appear here courtesy of LAT. (references E1334 and E1337)

Drag the blue bar either way to reveal the full extent of each image.

Triple M corner no. 111

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

There were just three Irish International Grand Prix which for a short period were held annually between 1929 until 1931. Competitors were tasked with lapping the four and a quarter mile course 71 times to cover the full 300 mile distance, all of this within the confines of Pheonix Park, Dublin, a huge open space well within the city’s boundaries. This ‘Motor’ plate image (LAT ref 680-2) shows the MG C Type Midget of Mr. H. D. Barker leading D. C. MacLaughlin’s Riley. While Barker finished sixth there were three C Type Midgets ahead of him, nine Midgets finishing in total, ensuring that the team prize went to the Earl of March’s all MG team. MacLaughlin’s Riley failed to finish.

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.33

By Triple M corner

AEW was the trade name for a north London firm of coachbuilders A.E. Wright Ltd., the business being based in Alexandra Park, N22. Their models (they bodied both Austin Sevens and Hornets) were distinctive in that the rear-ends lacked many curves with angular flat surfaces predominating. This two-seater model from 1932 looks well equipped with a Bluemel’s four spoke ‘Brooklands’ steering wheel, a top opening boot, full instrumentation and scuttle mounted Lucas 1130 side lights.

Triple M corner no.110

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

1929 MG Midget (TM 5050) took part in many events between 1929 and 1931, usually in the capable hands of Miss Schwedler while occassionaly being driven by CGH Dunham. Here Miss Schwedler is seen at the wheel during the course of the 1930 WASA Lands End Trial.  The photograph first appeared in an April 1930 edition of the Autocar while this scan was taken from the heavily retouched print used in that publication. Much of that original retouching has subsequently been removed in Photoshop. TM 5050 survives in California having now been restored. (LAT photoscan)

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.33

By Triple M corner

Corsica Coachworks produced one of the better looking bodies to adorn the Wolseley Hornet Special chassis. This example (JJ 87) was produced in late 1932 and is seen here in competition mode at the Kent & Sussex Light Car Club’s Speed Trial at Lewes on 12th May 1934. Crew details are not known. Another view of the car can be seen here.

Triple M corner no.109

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This LATplate (E9975) was exposed during the course of the 1935 Monte Carlo Rally the event being held between 19th & 27th January that year. The MG NA Magnette AAD 359 was entered and driven by E. Denyil-Lee and finished 77th in the overall general classification. The Austin Seven seen parked behind the Magnette was driven by W. Harney and finished four places higher than the MG. Unfortunately, the location at which this photograph was taken is unknown. AAD 359 survives and is regularly seen at VSCC events in East Anglia.

Triple M corner no.108

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Triple M corner no.99 was an image of a 1932 Abbey bodied MG Magna Coupe GX 827 which had appeared in a 1939 edition of The Autocar magazine. This recently acquired snapshot (below) is of the same car climbing what could be one of the test hills in the west country, although it is not carrying a competition number. The photograph is also not of professional quality, perhaps lending weight to the thought that it was taken as a holiday memento by one of the car’s occupants.

Triple M corner no.107

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

1931 MG M Type Midget UT 7942 is seen here in a sunken lane while taking part in a combined Inter Varsity/WASA trial in February 1935. No driver details are available although its known that Leicestershire registered UT 7942 carried chassis number 2M/2205. This car was campaigned extensively at WASA events during the period 1933-1935. (LAT Motorsport Film) Addendum: Tom Drewett is the current custodian of UT 7942 and advises that the driver of the car in this photograph is D.B. Tubbs, known as Bunny to his family and friends.

The Womens Automobile and Sports Association (WASA) was founded in 1927 and formally constituted as a club in 1929 to specifically enable women to take part in motor sport and other sporting events. While females could enter the annual national trials at that time some were excluded from certain observed sections of the route, therefore being unable to compete fairly against allcomers. Much more about WASA here.

Triple M Corner no.106

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This Autocar Photoscan from LAT Images shows one of the last production MG M Type Midgets (GX 803) leaving John o’Groats heavily laden with luggage. The car was first registered in London in the spring of 1932 and car and crew were undertaking an extensive Scottish tour for the magazine. The tour took place in the spring of 1933 and an excellent whole page photograph of the car overlooking Loch Broom appeared in the 30th June 1933 edition.

Triple M Corner no. 105

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The first Triple M Corner in this series (published on 2nd December 2015) displays an image of the same model, a 1934 season MG Magna Continental Coupe. The notes provided at that time indicate that just 100 examples of this unusual model found customers. However, The Autocar thought it sufficiently important to carry out a full road test, the results being published in its 13th April 1934 edition. (A copy of that road test can be found as a PDF at the foot of this page http://mgaguru.com/mgtech/history/hs105-l.htm) Two-seater salonettes were fashionable at that time, the Singer version epitomising the genre, this model being a significantly better seller than the MG offering. (LAT ‘Motor’ plate 565-15)

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.32

By Triple M corner

1935 Jensen Hornet Special: From being a comparatively lightweight six-cylinder model the factory Hornet Saloon gained weight and bulk throughout its six-year production life. The later ‘Special’ chassis’ supplied to coachbuilders in 1935 and 1936 were by now fitted with a 1604 cc version of the famous OHC power unit that started out in 1930 at 1271 cc. This 1935 Jensen ‘Allweather Sports’ Hornet was one of a long-line of Hornet based specials produced by the West Bromwich concern, this one showing off its sweeping mid-thirties styling to good effect, although the windscreen surround is reminiscent of the earlier Swallow Hornet models. (LATplate Motor 520-10)

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.31

By Triple M corner

1932 Eustace Watkins Hornet Special GY 3131 was owned by Miss C. Labouchere and was competitively used throughout 1933. Here her car is in London having been driven the 680 miles from John o’Groats on 21st January 1933, the first leg of the crew’s epic attempt to get to Monaco as competitors in that year’s Monte Carlo Rally. Both driver and co-driver appear weary in this night-time shot while their Hornet is covered in road dirt, testament to the trying conditions. Sadly, they failed to make Monte Carlo and were one of the 58 retirements from among the original 129 car entry. (Autocar photo scan 27/01/33 – courtesy LAT Images)

Triple M corner no.104

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

A trio of MG PA Midgets were entered by Capt. George Eyston for the 1935 Le Mans 24 hour event.  Unusualy, his car’s were to be crewed by an all female team of drivers that came to be known as Eyston’s Dancing Daughters. The three teams all finished the race in 24th, 25th and 26th positions with the Barbara Skinner – Doreen Evans car (no 55) covering 1285 miles over the 24 hour  day/night/day period of 15th and 16th June. Here Doreen Evans is seen at the wheel while the car is routinely serviced by her pit crew. (LATfilm C6558)

Triple M corner no.103

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This 1933 Carlisle registered MG J2 Midget HH 6753 is a long way from home. The car is seen here competing on a crowded Beggar’s Roost in Devon during the 1936 MCC Lands End Trial, while being driven by K W Mahany. This car/driver combination  were to go on and win a Premier award. (LATplate C8315)

Hornet Specials no.30

By Triple M corner

Although the majority of Hornet specials were open cars, plenty were constructed as sporting saloons or coupes. This particularly handsome example of a sporting two-door saloon was constructed by Patrick Motors of Bournebrook, Birmingham sometime in 1933 and was photographed in this leafy outer-suburbia setting for The Motor magazine.  (LATplate Motor 519-2)

Triple M corner no.102

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

D. G. Evans is photographed here in his MG ‘N’ Magnette (BLL 493) on Darracott, North Devon during the course of the 1935 MCC London-Lands End Trial held over 19th & 20th of April. With 313 cars starting the event, Evans was one of the 102 who gained a Premier Award that weekend. (LATplate C5776)

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.29

By Triple M corner

This photo of a 1934 Wolseley Hornet EW Daytona Special was taken on the Whittingham & Mitchell stand at the 1934 Olympia Motor Show in London. W&M were a Chelsea based coachbuilding firm, who under contract from Eustace Watkins, (Wolseley main dealers and also located in Chelsea) constructed bodies for the Hornet Special chassis. According to Nick Walker (author of the A-Z of British Coachbuilders – Bay View Books 2007) W&M were eventually acquired by Eustace Watkins, although not exclusively to build bodies for Wolseley cars, the firm providing bodies for a variety of marques.

Triple M corner no.101

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

A caption is required for this recently discovered LAT image (LATplate L5870) of a 1933 MG Magnette.

(Could this be Eyston’s 1933 Mannin Beg car as it’s carrying the correct racing number?)

Triple M corner no.100

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

DG 2327 is a 1931 Gloucester registered MG M Type Midget, identifiable as such by its angular wings. This photo was taken on the Isle of Man and is one of a sequence of a dozen or more shots, some of which were used for a subsequent Autocar ‘touring’ article. This image was taken in the centre of Douglas and is one of the few where the driver’s face can be seen and the car’s two-tone colour scheme is apparent. The re-positioning of the spare wheel was no doubt made to optimise luggage space in the small boot. The newsagent located immediately behind the car is carrying an advertisement for the latest paperback by Edgar Wallace, priced at 9d. (LATplate E3917) 

Triple M corner no.99

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

This atmospheric shot of an  MG Abbey bodied Magna Coupe appeared in a June 1939 edition of The Autocar. GX 827 was first registered in London during the spring of 1932 and was already seven years old at the time this photograph was taken near Kenworth(?), according to the caption on the rear of the photo. (LAT photoscan)

Hornet Specials no.28

By Triple M corner

The Arrow body upon the Hornet chassis of JD 1953 was constructed by coachbuilder A. P. Compton in late 1930 at their works in  a former tram depot in Hanwell, West London. Compton’s products at this time were all known as Arrow specials, their cars being identifiable by a stylised arrow attached to the radiator core of the host car. Miss P.D. Goodban was the owner of JD 1953 and she competed extensively in the car throughout the 1933 season. The two images seen here capture her and her car at the 1933 running of the Scottish Six Day Trial which took place between 15th and 20th May whereupon she won a bronze award for her efforts. From 1934 onward Miss Goodban’s name continued to be mentioned on the results pages of motoring magazines, but she was by now driving a Singer Nine. (Images courtesy of LAT – plate numbers C322 and Motor Box X274 476 -2 )

Triple M corner no.88

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Another scene from the 1933 IOM Mannin Beg race around the streets of the island’s capital, Douglas. Here Mansell in MG C Type no.4 leads the Ford-Baumer C Type no.12 along a residential road on the outskirts of the town. (Image courtesy of LAT Images)

Triple M corner no.87

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

An LAT image (LATplate Motor 779-33) depicting a scene from the 1934 RAC Ulster TT. (1st September 1934) The photographer has placed himself in front of Ards Town Hall to capture shots of the competitors crossing the square with the town hall as a backdrop. This surviving image shows two eventual non-finishers, Ashton-Rigby in his MG Magna leading Langley‘s Singer Nine across the square at precisely 12:32 PM according to the town hall clock.

Triple M corner no.86

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

MG C Type Midget RX 8303 is pictured here at Brooklands during the course of the Brighton & Hove Club race meeting in the summer of 1931. The car is stopped adjacent to the pits where the crew can be seen changing a wheel. (LATplate B7078)

Triple M corner no.85

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

The 1933 running of the Mannin Beg race around the streets of Douglas, Isle of Man took place on Wednesday 12th July. While 20 cars entered just 14 started, including ‘Billie’ Sullivan’s Morris Minor. Sullivan and ten others failed to finish the gruelling 50 lap, 230 mile race, the eventual winner being Freddie Dixon in his Riley. Two C Types Midgets finished, second place going to car number 4 (Mansell), with the Ford/Baumer car (no.12) finishing third. Here Hamilton’s Magnette (16) trails the Ford/Baumer C Type at St. Andrew’s Church on the corner of Finch Road and Prospect Hill. Although Hamilton set the fastest lap time of the race he was to retire after 35 laps with a back-axle problem. This superb image is available from LAT Images – quote reference LATplate C1044 when enquiring.

NB Why the single front wing on the Ford/Baumer C Type?

Triple M corner no.84

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

A total of 69 cars took part in the Light Car Club’s 1931 inaugural Relay ‘Grand Prix’. The conditions were awful and a large part of the race was run in torrential rain. This photo shows the start of the race with the ‘scratch cars’ from Littlewood-Clarke’s MG Midget team and the Randall led Austin Seven trio about to come under starters orders. A full report on the proceedings can be found on the Austin Harris website here.

(Editors note: This image had always intrigued me, as the head of the crew member in the Austin Seven seen staring straight at the camera, always struck me as looking like a bodyless cardboard cut-out! An opportunity to examine a high-resolution image reveals that he is wearing a white racing overall which against the smoke of his car’s exhaust makes his torso virtually invisible.)

Triple M corner no.83

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

A dramatic scene from the 11th March 1933 BARC meeting at Brooklands. Wright’s ‘C’ Type Midget was taking part in the Weybridge Junior Handicap, a race over a distance of just six miles. According to Motor Sport the Midget had not been running well and was in the process of being retired at the fork when the car caught fire causing much smoke and mayhem. Apparently ‘the Pyrene men’ came to the rescue although two of these individuals look very much like policemen. Meanwhile, Wright looks on. (LATplate B9639)

Hornet Specials no. 27

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The second Light Car Club Relay Grand Prix took place at Brooklands on Saturday 16th July 1932 with 29, three car teams taking part. Among this 87 car strong field was a team entered by Eustace Watkins sales manager Stanley Hutchens. His team consisted of two of the new EW Hornet Daytona Specials (driven by Hutchens and Bertram Wickens) and an earlier 1931 EW Hornet International driven by Edward Erith. A complex handicapping system ensured that racing was close over a full 90 laps of the famous Surrey circuit. Each car was required to finish 30 laps before handing over to a team mate. The Hornets performed impeccably and won the race. This image shows the three drivers (left to right – Hutchens, Erith and Wickens) recieving congratulations from the Earl of March. (LATplate B8744)

Triple M corner no. 81

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

1934 RAC Ulster TT – Ards Circuit. This extract from LATplate C4620 shows Dodson crossing the finishing line at the wheel of Geoge Eyston’s MG NE Magnette, winning the 500 mile race at an average speed of 74.5 mph. For those in the UK the BBC have this excellent newsreel clip to view, while the full results can be found here.

Hornet Specials no.26

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Yet another image from the 13th May 1933 Donington Park meeting which on this occasion features an MG Magna sandwiched between two EW Hornet specials. The years 1932 and 1933 were particularly successful for the Hornet and the factory made ‘Special’ chassis with a number of notable successes both on the track and in trials and rallies. Here car number 19, driven by J. Tatton-Ridd leads C. C. Martin driving his MG Magna (no.9) with Dr. E. Hawes in another Hornet at the rear of the trio.(LATplate C454)

Triple M corner no.80

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Another image from the 13th May 1933 Donington Hall meeting. Little is known about either of the two cars seen here. The J2 is carrying a registration of AMX 650. Any further information appreciated. Please email info@prewarminor.com This is an edited extract from LATplate C461.

This response from Cathelijne Spoelstra: No. 80 shows Eddy Hall in C0268 at the May meeting at Donington in 1933. There were three 850cc Midgets entered that day which doesn’t really help when trying to allocate the J2. Unfortunately the database has no record of the registration number.

Wolseley Hornet Specials no.25

By Triple M corner

The second International Relay Race was held at the Brooklands circuit in 1932. The winning team of three Hornets was made-up of two 1932 Eustace Watkins Daytona Specials and an earlier 1931 Eustace Watkins International model. The International was driven by Edward Erith who is seen here in the same car as he drove that day – GO 6468. In May of that year Erith took his Hornet to Lewes in Sussex having entered the annual speed trials on the downs. Alongside Erith in this paddock shot is a late 1931 Kent registered Swallow Hornet Special while yet more Hornets await their turn behind the leading duo. (LAT Motor Sport negative)

Triple M corner no.79

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

A 1933 Somerset registered 1933 MG J2 Midget (YD 6854) is seen here taking part in the driving test section of the 1935 MCC Torquay Rally & Trial. The details of this rally are not recorded in Donald Cowbourne’s book ‘British Rally Drivers – their cars and awards’ therefore the crew of car number 173 will have to remain unnamed. This is a restored version of LATplate C7066

Triple M corner no.78

By Triple M corner

The Triple M series of MG’s all belong to a family of models that commenced with the 1929 MG Midget and continued through to the mid-thirties via a long string of four and six cylinder OHC engined cars that forged the marques identity.

Little is known about the car and crew in this paddock image. It was taken at Donington Hall on the occasion of just the second race meeting to be held at the venue on 13th May 1933. The man standing behind the car has a cardboard tag hanging from his lapel labelled ‘Mechanic’ while both crew members pose for the camera in their crash helmets. The remainder of their attire is more appropriate for a trip to the pub rather than 20 laps around a race circuit. (LATplate C460)